The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Volume 46

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J. Limbird, 1845
Containing original essays; historical narratives, biographical memoirs, sketches of society, topographical descriptions, novels and tales, anecdotes, select extracts from new and expensive works, the spirit of the public journals, discoveries in the arts and sciences, useful domestic hints, etc. etc. etc.
 

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Page 12 - ... no tradesman, artificer, workman, labourer, or other person whatsoever shall do or exercise any worldly labour, business or work of their ordinary callings, upon the Lord's Day, or any part thereof (works of necessity and charity only excepted...
Page 400 - It appeared as if there were a sort of match, or trial of skill, you must understand, between the kettle and the Cricket. And this is what led to it, and how it came about.
Page 12 - ... no Person or Persons shall use, employ or travel upon the Lord's day with any Boat, wherry, lighter or barge, except it be upon extraordinary occasion, to be allowed by some Justice of the Peace of the County...
Page 157 - Or if the one species of labour requires an uncommon degree of dexterity and ingenuity, the esteem which men have for such talents, will naturally give a value to their produce, superior to what would be due to the time employed about it. Such talents can seldom be acquired but in consequence of long application, and the superior value of their produce may frequently be no more than a reasonable compensation for the time and labour which must be spent in acquiring them.
Page 401 - ... murky air; and I don't know that it is one, for it's nothing but a glare; of deep and angry crimson, where the sun and wind together; set a brand upon the clouds for being guilty of such weather; and the widest open country is a long dull streak of black; and there's hoarfrost on the finger-post, and thaw upon the track; and the ice it isn't water, and the water isn't free; and you couldn't say that anything is what it ought to be; but he's coming, coming, coming! And here, if you like...
Page 263 - A sunbeam which hath lost its way, And through the crevice and the cleft Of the thick wall is fallen and left ; Creeping o'er the floor so damp, Like a marsh's meteor lamp...
Page 46 - The residence of people of fortune and refinement in the country has diffused a degree of taste and elegance in rural economy, that descends to the lowest class. The very labourer, with his thatched cottage and narrow slip of ground, attends to their embellishment.
Page 87 - Let him that desires to see others happy make haste to give while his gift can be enjoyed, and remember that every moment of delay takes away something from the value of his benefaction. And let him, who purposes his own happiness, reflect, that while he forms his purpose the day rolls on, and the night cometh when no man can work.
Page 311 - Take that ! she will call me a fool and scold me, if I carry a chip to her.' ' No,' I replied, ' she will not, take it, and go immediately; I am in haste.
Page 157 - ... what it really costs the person who brings it to market; for though in common language what is called the prime cost of any commodity does not comprehend the profit of the person who is to sell it again, yet if he sells it at a price which does not allow him the ordinary rate of profit in his neighbourhood, he is evidently a loser by the trade ; since by employing his stock in some other way he might have made that profit.

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