The Mirror of the Sea

Front Cover
ReadHowYouWant.com, Jan 14, 2008 - Fiction - 312 pages
0 Reviews
In his autobiographical novel, The mirror of the Sea, Conrad muses on his twenty years' sea-faring career. While philosophizing on the sea, the author records his personal anecdotes as a sailor and ships officer and refers to the various personalities from his past. An unreserved account of his profoundly personal life is honestly depicted. A realistic and an atypical memoir!
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

LANDFALLS AND DEPARTURES
1
EMBLEMS OF HOPE
16
THE FINE ART
30
COBWEBS AND GOSSAMER
47
THE WEIGHT OF THE BURDEN
62
Chapter XIV
65
Chapter XV
71
OVERDUE AND MISSING
78
THE FAITHFUL RIVER
143
Chapter XXXI
147
Chapter XXXII
155
IN CAPTIVITY
162
Chapter XXXIV
170
INITIATION
181
Chapter XXXVI
192
THE NURSERY OF THE CRAFT
208

Chapter XVII
82
Chapter XVIII
85
Chapter XIX
88
THE GRIP OF THE LAND
92
Chapter XXI
95
THE CHARACTER OF THE FOE
100
Chapter XXIII
104
Chapter XXIV
110
RULES OF EAST AND WEST
113
Chapter XXVI
116
Chapter XXVII
123
Chapter XXVIII
131
Chapter XXIX
138
Chapter XXXVIII
212
Chapter XXXIX
214
THE TREMOLINO
218
Chapter XLI
221
Chapter XLII
227
Chapter XLIII
231
Chapter XLIV
240
Chapter XLV
250
THE HEROIC AGE
259
Chapter XLVII
262
Chapter XLVIII
267
Chapter XLIX
272
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Joseph Conrad is recognized as one of the 20th century's greatest English language novelists. He was born Jozef Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowski on December 3, 1857, in the Polish Ukraine. His father, a writer and translator, was from Polish nobility, but political activity against Russian oppression led to his exile. Conrad was orphaned at a young age and subsequently raised by his uncle. At 17 he went to sea, an experience that shaped the bleak view of human nature which he expressed in his fiction. In such works as Lord Jim (1900), Youth (1902), and Nostromo (1904), Conrad depicts individuals thrust by circumstances beyond their control into moral and emotional dilemmas. His novel Heart of Darkness (1902), perhaps his best known and most influential work, narrates a literal journey to the center of the African jungle. This novel inspired the acclaimed motion picture Apocalypse Now. After the publication of his first novel, Almayer's Folly (1895), Conrad gave up the sea. He produced thirteen novels, two volumes of memoirs, and twenty-eight short stories. He died on August 3, 1924, in England.

Bibliographic information