The Miscellaneous Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott, Bart, Volume 2

Front Cover
R. Cadell, 1834
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 454 - When on my sickly couch I lay, Impatient both of night and day, Lamenting in unmanly strains, Call'd every power to ease my pains ; Then Stella ran to my relief, With cheerful face and inward grief ; And, though by Heaven's severe decree She suffers hourly more than me, No cruel master could require, From slaves employ'd for daily hire, What Stella, by her friendship warm'd, With vigour and delight perform'd...
Page 115 - Lord Treasurer, after leaving the Queen, came through the room, beckoning Dr. Swift to follow him : both went off just before prayers.
Page 66 - than I can say ; I never remember any weather that was not too hot or too cold, too wet or too dry ; but, however God Almighty contrives it, at the end of the year 'tis all very well.
Page 399 - Would he were fatter ! But I fear him not : Yet if my name were liable to fear, I do not know the man I should avoid So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much ; He is a great observer and he looks Quite through the deeds of men...
Page 213 - Thou, Stella, wert no longer young', When first for thee my harp was strung, Without one word of Cupid's darts, Of killing eyes, or bleeding hearts ; With Friendship and Esteem possest, I ne'er admitted Love a guest.
Page 305 - We were all, at the first night of it, in great uncertainty of the event ; till we were very much encouraged by overhearing the Duke of Argyle, who sat in the next box to us, say, ' It will do — it must do ! I see it in the eyes of them.
Page 72 - Good God, what a genius I had when I wrote that book!
Page 233 - I'll tell you one that first comes into my head. One evening, Gay and I went to see him : you know how intimately we were all acquainted. On our coming in, ' heyday, gentlemen, (says the doctor) what's the meaning of this visit?
Page 112 - I warned him of, never to appear cold to me, for I would not be treated like a school-boy ; that I had felt too much of that in my life already...
Page 399 - He reads much; He is a great observer and he looks Quite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music; Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort As if he mock'd himself and scorn'd his spirit That could be moved to smile at any thing.

Bibliographic information