The Moral Self

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1998 - Philosophy - 236 pages
0 Reviews
The Moral Self addresses the question of how morality enters into our lives. Pauline Chazan draws upon psychology, r ral philosophy and literary interpretation to rebut the view that morality's role is to limit desire and control self-love. Perserving the ancients' connection between what is good for the self and what is morally good, Chazan argues that a certain kind of care for the self is central to moral agency. Her intriguing argument begins with a critical examination of the views of Hume, Rousseau and Hegel. The constructive part of the book takes a more unusual turn by synthesising the work on the analyst Heinz Kohut and Aristotle into Chazan's own positive account, which is then illustrated by the use of Russian literature.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Hume on selfvaluing and moral selfhood
13
Rousseau The generators of selfvaluing and the constitution of the moral self
31
Hegel Ethical selfvaluing and the constitution of the moral self
50
Aristotle and Kohut Converging perspectives
63
Significant action and the self
88
Valuing the self and moral life
111
The ethical significance of love of self
127
Love of self and morality The search for good and evil
154
Conclusion
192
Notes
199
Bibliography
226
Name Index
232
Subject Index
234
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Philosophy and Friendship
Sandra Lynch
No preview available - 2005
All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

Chazan teaches philosophy at LaTrobe University, Australia.

Bibliographic information