The Mouse and the Motorcycle

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Sep 1, 1990 - Juvenile Fiction - 208 pages
24 Reviews

"Boy!" said Ralph to himself, his whiskers quivering with excitement. "Boy, oh boy!" Feeling that this was an important moment in his life, he took hold of the handgrips. They felt good and solid beneath his paws. Yes, this motorcycle was a good machine all right.

Ralph the mouse ventures out from behind the piney knothole in the wall of his hotel-room home, scrambles up the telephone wire to the end table, and climbs aboard the toy motorcycle left there by a young guest. His thrill ride does not last long. The ringing telephone startles Ralph, and he and the motorcycle take a terrible fall - right to the bottom of a metal wastebasket. Luckily, Keith, the owner of the motorcycle, returns to find his toy. Keith rescues Ralph and teaches him how to ride the bike. Thus begins a great friendship and many awesome adventures. Once a mouse can ride a motorcyle ... almost anything can happen!

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
14
4 stars
8
3 stars
1
2 stars
1
1 star
0

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book seemed to be very interesting when I had seen it on the Internet because I have a few reasons why you should read this book.
* First of all it is very interesting when I had seen it and
you should try it out!
* Second of all it is very good to read for when feeling blue or happy
ENJOY IF. YOU WANT TO READ THIS
BOOK !
THANK YOU
 

Good

User Review  - Terry - Target

Came with a page bent up. Looked like it was that way before packaging. Otherwise ok. Read full review

All 11 reviews »

Contents

I
11
II
19
III
28
IV
35
V
48
VI
61
VII
74
VIII
86
IX
95
X
106
XI
120
XII
131
XIII
142
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 36 - Well, just before this for [fell] in my eye, he got down on his hands and knees and looked under the platform and made circular swing with his right arm as though reaching for something; might have tossed something out of his hand, I couldn't say. Q. Did you see any mortar leave his hand? A. No, sir. Q. Did you see any in it? A. I didn't see any in it.
Page 67 - I can't see the movie screen while you have that hat on. Also in this class belong, possibly: How many times have I told you (must I tell you) not to eat with your fingers? I must have told you a dozen times not to eat with your mouth open. If I have told you once I have told you a thousand times not to wear your hat in the house.
Page 50 - He picked up his tail, took a deep breath, bent low over the handlebars, flattened his ears, and sped down the straightaway as fast as the motorcycle would go. He could feel his whiskers swept back by the force of his speed. It was glorious!
Page 38 - Now come on. Tell me, did you or didn't you ride my motorcycle off the bedside table?" This took Ralph by surprise. He had not expected the boy to guess what happened. "Well, yes. I guess you might say I did," confessed Ralph, rubbing his aching muscles.
Page 11 - KEITH, the boy in the rumpled shorts and shirt, did not know he was being watched as he entered room 215 of the Mountain View Inn.
Page 77 - He did not know how much longer he could hold out against the machine.
Page 68 - I want to go out and see the world. I want to go down on the ground floor and see the kitchen and the dining room and the storeroom and the garbage cans out back.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1990)

Beverly Cleary was born in McMinnville, Oregon, and until she was old enough to attend school she lived on a farm in Yamhill, a town so small it had no library. Her mother arranged to have books sent to their tiny town from the state library and acted as a librarian in a room over a bank. It was there that Mrs. Cleary learned to love books. Generations of children have grown up with Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, Ralph Mouse, and all of their friends, families, and assorted pets. Beverly Cleary continues to capture the hearts and imaginations of children of all ages throughout the world.

Bibliographic information