The Muqaddimah : an introduction to history ; in three volumes. 1

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 1969 - History - 465 pages
5 Reviews


The Muqaddimah, often translated as "Introduction" or "Prolegomenon," is the most important Islamic history of the premodern world. Written by the great fourteenth-century Arab scholar Ibn Khaldūn (d. 1406), this monumental work laid down the foundations of several fields of knowledge, including philosophy of history, sociology, ethnography, and economics. The first complete English translation, by the eminent Islamicist and interpreter of Arabic literature Franz Rosenthal, was published in three volumes in 1958 as part of the Bollingen Series and received immediate acclaim in America and abroad. A one-volume abridged version of Rosenthal's masterful translation was first published in 1969.


This new edition of the abridged version, with the addition of a key section of Rosenthal's own introduction to the three-volume edition, and with a new introduction by Bruce B. Lawrence, will reintroduce this seminal work to twenty-first-century students and scholars of Islam and of medieval and ancient history.


 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
2
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - GrlIntrrptdRdng - LibraryThing

I read this for Mark Zuckerberg’s book club, A Year Of Books. I did not read The Muqaddimah fully, the first 100 pages I read, but after that I just skimmed. This book isn’t for me, I don’t care for ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ajdeus - LibraryThing

The Muqaddimah is a pleasurable read for experts with many surprises (in the background/sidelines). Rosenthal's bracket fillers are sometimes annoying and misleading. Khaldun finished the work in 1377 ... Read full review

Contents

I
11
II
33
III
45
IV
49
V
58
VI
63
VII
65
VIII
70
IX
91
X
123
XI
263
XII
297
XIII
333
XIV
459
XV
460
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - The inner meaning of history, on the other hand, involves speculation and an attempt to get at the truth, subtle explanation of the causes and origins of existing things, and deep knowledge of the how and why of events.
Page 5 - For on the surface history is no more than information about political events, dynasties, and occurrences of the remote past, elegantly presented and spiced with proverbs.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information