The Musical Human: Rethinking John Blacking's Ethnomusicology in the Twenty-first Century

Front Cover
Suzel Ana Reily
Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2006 - Music - 220 pages
0 Reviews
The musical human: without a doubt, this vision of the human species as naturally musical has become the most enduring legacy John Blacking bequeathed to ethnomusicology. The image aptly embodies his preoccupations, which integrated theoretical and methodological issues within the discipline with a deep concern for the physical and psychological well-being of humanity. Blacking believed sincerely in the power of music, and he contended that people's general health depended upon the musical opportunities made available to them. For this reason, he placed great importance upon ethnomusicology, the discipline that investigates the way different societies around the world organize their musical activities, and the impact of these diverse alternatives upon the people involved in them. Each essay draws upon distinct aspects of Blacking's writings but complements them with quite different sets of sources.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Understanding Humanly Organized Sound
12
Tonal Reinterpretation in Venda Guitar Songs
37
Life History and Migrant Womens Music
71
A Case from Japan
87
Pleasure Pain Power
125
Creating a Musical Space for Experiencing the OtherSelf Within
143
John Blacking and Historical Musicology
171
Bibliography
193
Index
213
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Suzel Ana Reily is Reader at the School of Anthropological Studies, Queen's University Belfast, UK.

Bibliographic information