The Musician's Home Recording Handbook: Practical Techniques for Recording Great Music at Home

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Hal Leonard Corporation, 1992 - Music - 173 pages
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(Reference). This is the ideal handbook for musicians who want to make high-quality recordings at home. The author's basic philosophy is that musicianship, not equipment, is the essential ingredient in a great recording. With skill, creativity, and a can-do attitude, anyone can produce CD-quality recorded music at home with a minimum of technology and training. The book makes general, practical musical sense of the complex technology of home recording. It will prove useful to those just getting started in home recording, to those trying to fill in holes in their recording background, and to musicians who would just like to understand more clearly what goes on in the studio. The book is based on a popular series of columns in Guitar Player magazine.
 

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Contents

I
14
II
17
III
23
IV
29
V
37
VI
38
VII
42
VIII
45
XVIII
91
XIX
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XX
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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IX
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X
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XI
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XVII
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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About the author (1992)

Ted Greenwald has excelled in a variety of creative fields. As a poet, he has published more than 20 books of poetry since the 1960s, including Licorice Chronicles (1979), considered a masterwork by poets of the "Language" group. A musician and rock historian as well, Greenwald has published several books about the Beatles and has been a contributor to Keyboard Magazine and Musician. His books Music (Careers Without College) (1992), and The Musician's Home Recording Handbook: Practical Techniques for Recording Great Music at Home (1992) are both handbooks and inspiration for aspiring musicians. Greenwald is also the owner of the Ted Greenwald art gallery in New York City.

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