The Mysticism of Saint Augustine: Rereading The Confessions

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2005 - Religion - 160 pages
Augustine's vision at Ostia is one of the most influential accounts of mystical experience in the Western tradition, and a subject of persistent interest to Christians, philosophers and historians.
This book explores Augustine's account of his experience as set down in the Confessions and considers his mysticism in relation to his classical Platonist philosophy. John Peter Kenney argues that while the Christian contemplative mysticism created by Augustine is in many ways founded on Platonic thought, Platonism ultimately fails Augustine in that it cannot retain the truths that it anticipates. The Confessions offer a response to this impasse by generating two critical ideas in medieval and modern religious thought: firstly, the conception of contemplation as a purely epistemic event, in contrast to classical Platonism; secondly, the tenet that salvation is absolutely distinct from enlightenment.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Flight to the alone
15
A kind of rest
36
Books of the Platonists
49
The presence of truth
73
PART III
87
Total concentration of the heart
110
Snatched up to Paradise
129
Conclusion
146
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Mystics
William Harmless
Limited preview - 2007

About the author (2005)

John Peter Kenney is Dean and Professor of Religious Studies at St. Michael's College in Vermont.

Bibliographic information