The Myth of Sisyphus: Renaissance Theories of Human Perfectibility

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Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 2007 - History - 614 pages
The myth of Sisyphus symbolizes the idealization of human excellence as a perpetual process of becoming over the impossibility of absolute achievement. In Stoic philosophy, the writing of the Early Church Fathers, and in its allegorical interpretations in medieval and renaissance mythologies, Sisyphus is the archetypal model of human perfectibility. This Sisyphean archetype is a principal theme in renaissance theories of astral magic in the works of Pico, Ficino, Reuchlin, Paracelsus, Agrippa, and Dee. Erasmus, Melanchthon, and Ascham, and in utopian thought from More to Bacon. Sisyphus illuminates the sacred mysteries of life in the works of Philo Judaeus, Plato, Nicholas Cusanus, and Ficino; the spiritual and sensual contraries of love in the dialogues of Leone Ebreo, Bembo, and Bruno; and the tribulations of the unrequited lover in the works of Petrarch, Ronsard, and Sidney.
 

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did not help much but was very educational to learn/read about the myth of Sisyphus

Contents

Sisyphus from Myth to Archetype
27
The Stoic Sisyphus
50
The Patristic Sisyphus
67
Sisyphus in Medieval and Renaissance Mythography
86
Sisyphus as Astral Magician
110
Sisyphus as Humanist
136
Sisyphus as Lover
193
Sisyphus as Hero
313
Notes
427
Bibliography
544
Index
597
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