The Myths and Fables of To-day

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Lee & Shepard, 1900 - Folklore - 268 pages
 

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Page 138 - That us'd to break up ground, and dig) The bride to nothing but her will, That nulls the. after-marriage still: 310 Some were for th...
Page 219 - ... looking in that glass, I saw myself reflected nearly at full length; but my face, I noticed, had two separate and distinct images, the tip of the nose of one being about three inches from the tip of the other. I was a little bothered, perhaps startled, and got up and looked in the glass, but the illusion vanished. On lying down again, I saw it a second time, plainer, if possible, than before; and then I noticed that one of the faces was a little paler — say, five shades — than the other....
Page 45 - The west wind always brings wet weather, The east wind wet and cold together, The south wind surely brings us rain, The north wind blows it back again. " If the sun in red should set, The next day surely will be wet ; If the sun should set in grey, The next will be a rainy day.
Page 248 - By the apostle Paul, shadows to-night Have struck more terror to the soul of Richard, Than can the substance of ten thousand soldiers, Armed in proof, and led by shallow Richmond.
Page 28 - One, I love, Two, I love, Three, I love, I say, Four, I love with all my heart, And five, I cast away ; Six, he loves, Seven, she loves, Eight, they both love ; Nine, he comes, Ten, he tarries, Eleven, he courts, Twelve, he marries ; Thirteen wishes, Fourteen kisses, All the rest little witches.
Page 125 - Two Hazel Nuts I threw into the Flame, And to each Nut I gave a Sweet-heart's Name. This with the loudest Bounce me sore amaz'd, That in a Flame of brightest Colour blaz'd. As blaz'd the Nut, so may thy Passion grow, For 'twas thy Nut that did so brightly glow.
Page 220 - sign " that I was to be elected to a second term of office, and that the paleness of one of the faces was an omen that I should not see life through the last term.
Page 21 - About this time there fell out a thing worthy of observation. Mr. Winthrop the younger, one of the magistrates, having many books in a chamber where there was corn of divers sorts, had among them one wherein the Greek testament, the psalms and the common prayer were bound together. He found the common prayer eaten with mice, every leaf of it, and not any of the two other touched, nor any other of his books, though there were above a thousand.
Page 217 - All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come.
Page 128 - A clover, a clover of two, put it in your right shoe, The first young man you meet in field, street, or lane, You'll have him or one of his name.

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