The Narrow & Wide Gauges Considered: Also, Effects of Competition and Government Supervision ...

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E. Wilson, 1845 - Railroad gauges - 36 pages
 

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Page 10 - I shall now consider the subject of the width of gauge. The question of the disadvantage of differing in point of gauge from other railways, and the consequent exclusion from communication with them, is the first. This is undoubtedly an inconvenience; it amounts to a prohibition to almost any railway running northwards from London, as they must all more or less depend for their supply upon other lines or districts where railways already exist, and with which they most hope to be connected.
Page 10 - ... an inconvenience; it amounts to a prohibition to almost any railway running northwards from London, as they must all more or less depend for their supply upon other lines or districts where railways already exist, and with which they must hope to be connected. In such cases there is no alternative. The Great Western Railway, however, broke ground in an entirely new district, in which railways were unknown. At present it commands this district, and has already sent forth branches which embrace...
Page 20 - Trains running at high speed, which are now being introduced on the leading roads, they deem it probable that many Companies possessing Trunk Lines on the Narrow Gauge principle may find it their interest to adopt both...
Page 11 - ... own dimensions, — and none of the difficulties which would entirely prevent such a course in the North of England, had any existence in the West ; and consequently, all the general arguments advanced, and the comparisons made, on the supposition of such difficulties occurring, — all excellent in case they did, — are totally inapplicable to the particular case of the Great Western Railway, to which they have no reference whatever.
Page 11 - England had any existence in the west, and consequently all the general arguments advanced, and the comparisons made, on the supposition of such difficulties occurring — all excellent in case they did — are totally inapplicable to the particular case of the Great Western Railway, to which they have no reference whatever.* * Mr.

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