The New Careers: Individual Action and Economic Change

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SAGE, Jul 28, 1999 - Business & Economics - 192 pages
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`To career used to mean to swerve wildly or to go swiftly. In this beautifully argued, richly documented, original, liberating work, Arthur, Inksen, and Pringle demonstrate that the new careers once more are about swift swerves, unexpected agency, and enacted opportunities and constraints. Readers will think about the future in ways they never imagined possible. This is a good book. People need to get it in their hands to see how good it is'- Karl Weick, University of Michigan

The New Careers offers a major new approach to the concept of career and the relation of the individual to the contemporary workplace. It shows that our traditional conceptions of careers are rooted in the stable conditions of the Industrial State model which has dominated the Twentieth century and that new models, better attuned to the New Economy of the later Twentieth and early Twenty-first centuries are now needed.

The book points to careers as actions rather than structures, as a means of learning rather than means of earning, and as boundaryless entities rather than constrained ones. It also points to the return of the career as a key concept in social analysis, but shows that in the light of new phenomena, the `career' as we traditionally know it will never be the same again.

This innovative and accessible book is based on work for which Michael Arthur, Kerr Inkson and Judith Pringle won the Academy of Management prize for best section paper, which forms the core of this book.

 

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Contents

1 Careers Employment and Economies in Transition
1
2 Exploring New Patterns of Career Behavior
22
3 Enactment in Career Behavior
39
Engaging with Unfamiliar Situations
59
Pursuing Career Pathways
80
Rounding Out Career Experience
101
7 Turning Career COmpetencies into Career Capital
120
8 Investing Career Capital in Social Institutions
142
From Present to Future
163
Index
179
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About the author (1999)

Michael Arthur is a professor of Management at Suffolk University in Botson MA. Professor Arthur is an originator and princuple advocate of the notion of 'boundary'less careers'. In 2007, Michael recieved the Academy of Management's Everett Hughes Award for lifetime achievement in the field of career studies

Kerr Inkson is an Emeritus Professor at The University of Auckland Business School, New Zealand. He has a PhD from the University of Otago. His 47-year academic career included 24 years as full Professor, at five New Zealand universities. An expert in management, organizational behavior and career development, Kerr has published 17 books, over 50 book chapters and 75 refereed journal articles. His most recent books are Understanding Careers (SAGE – 2nd edition due in Nov 2014); Cultural Intelligence (co-authored with David C Thomas, 2nd edition, Berrett-Koehler, 2009); Career Studies (4-volume collection, co-edited with Mark Savickas, SAGE, 2012); and Managing Expatriates (co-authored with Yvonne McNulty, Business Expert Press, 2013). His careers research includes interests in new forms of career, the use of metaphor in career theory and practice, and international careers. His journal credits include Administrative Science Quarterly, Human Relations, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management Studies, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Journal of World Business, Organizational Dynamics, and Organization Studies. He is a former Chair of the Careers Division, Academy of Management.

Dr. Judith Pringle is a Professor of Organisation Studies in the Management department in the AUT Faculty of Business and Law. Her specialist research interests lie in the areas of women, gender, diversity and careers. She currently teaches ‘Gender and Diversity in Organisations’ at postgraduate level. She is a co-investigator on the Marsden funded grant ‘Glamour and grind: New Creative Workers’, co-editor of the Sage Handbook of Workplace Diversity (2006) and The New Careers: Individual Action and Economic Change (1999). She published chapters in edited books and wide ranging articles in journals such as Gender Work and Organization, British Journal of Management, International Journal of HRM, Journal of World Business, Personnel Review, Organization, Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources, Women and Management Review, Women Studies Journal (NZ) and consistently contributes to international conferences. She is on the editorial board for British Journal of Management, editor for the Gender and Diversity division of Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences and member of the European Groups of Organization Studies Standing Group on Gender and Diversity. She has four Emerald journal citations. Judith is a Pakeha New Zealander who grew up on a sheep farm in the South Island. Her academic study began in psychology culminating in a doctorate in social psychology. Study was interrupted by OE (overseas experience) where she had 19 different jobs in a variety of countries. Before her academic career she was a self-employed consultant with large and small public and private sectors organisations. Over the last two decades (formerly at University of Auckland) she has researched extensively issues relating to the various experiences of women in organisations. This has been an evolutionary research pathway exploring strategies used by women in male-dominated organisations, experiences of senior women managers and leaders, the functioning and cultures of Pakeha, Maori and Pacific Island women-run organisations (non-profit and business). A related research strand is how individuals change and adapt their careers to shifting job opportunities. With colleagues she has critiqued and broken open the traditional career theory to create more inclusive models that are better labelled as career-life frames. Earlier methodologies were within a positivist paradigm while latterly she has been greatly influenced by the emergence of critical approaches. Now she researches, and supervises graduate students, working primarily in an interpretive paradigm. Data is drawn from interviews and ethnographic materials and meaning made through life history and narrative analyses. Judith is coordinator of the Gender and Diversity Research Group, an AUT wide network of researchers

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