The New Management of Engineering

Front Cover
Lulu.com, 2005 - Technology & Engineering - 276 pages
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The first book that explains why managing engineering is more difficult, more demanding and more important than managing any other human activity in modern society. It explains how, by adhering to the principles taught by Peter F. Drucker in his landmark book "The Practice of Management," managers can exploit the full potentials of their peoples' talents and of changing technologies, methods and markets. It brings together the whole range of methods used by the world's best performing engineering companies, including research, design, development, testing, production and maintenance. The philosophy and methods for achieving excellence in quality and reliability are fully described. The book offers fresh insights into a wide range of current engineering management issues, including education, MBA training, quality and safety standards and the roles of institutions, cultures and governments in engineering.
 

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Contents

From Science To Engineering
7
Scientific Thinking
8
Engineering Thinking
11
Scepticism
13
Determinism
15
Variation
17
Materials Components and Processes
19
Cost and Competitiveness
20
Design of LogicBasic Products
145
Design For Machine Production
146
Design For Manual Assembly
147
Computer Aided Engineering
148
Conclusions
150
Development Testing
151
The Need for Development Testing
153
Reliability and Durability
154

Conclusion
22
People At Work
24
Moder Ideas of Motivation and Management
25
Maslows Hierarchy of Needs
27
Druckers New Management
28
Demings 14 Points
30
Later Writers
32
Individuals Talent and Motivations
33
Teams
34
Committees and Meetings
37
Stress
38
Conflict
39
Stupidity
41
Applying the New Management to Engineering
42
Developing Engineers
45
Selecting Engineers
47
Graduates
49
Experienced People
50
Managers
51
Higher Management
53
Training and Development
54
Seniority Promotion and Salaries
55
Objectives and Appraisals
57
The Personnel Management Function
63
Conclusion
65
Organizing Engineering
68
Traditional Management
69
Organizational Forms
70
The Optimum Organization for Engineering
74
Project Teams
78
Interfacing Project and Functional Management
80
Business Processes
81
Business Process reEngineering
82
Technology Impact on Organization and Processes
84
Business Systems
85
The Internet and Email
86
Consultants
87
Research
89
The Organization of Higher Management
95
Making the Changes
97
Conclusions
98
Principles of Organization
100
Managing Engineering Projects
102
Core Technologies
104
Make Or Buy?
107
Overseas Manufacture
110
Time Management
114
Information
118
Suppliers
119
PurchaserSupplier
120
External Constraints
127
Money
128
Minimising Total Costs
130
Conclusions
132
Design
134
Product Strategy
137
Design Optimisation and Innovation
138
Quality Function Deployment
140
TRIZ
142
Design of LogicBased Products
143
Optimizing the Development Test Programme
155
Costs and Benefits
156
Quantity to Test
157
Simulation
158
Test Conditions
159
Accelerated Test
160
Testing Software and Digital Systems
161
Testing the Processes
163
Collecting and Analyzing Test Data
164
Conclusions
165
Production
167
Systems of Manufacturing
168
Problems with Traditional Mass Production
169
The New Production Philosophy
173
Suppliers
175
Just In Time Production
177
Making the Transition
178
Technology Impact
180
Stress Testing
182
Quality Reliability and Safety
184
The Costs of Quality and Reliability
185
Optimum Quality
190
Variation
193
Variation and Statistics
195
Statistical Experiments
197
Statistics and Engineering
200
Process Variation
202
Statistical Sampling for Inspection and Test
207
Reliability
209
Quantifying Reliability
212
Safety
215
Quality Reliability and Safety Standards
217
Reliability
220
Contracts for Quality and Reliability
221
Managing Quality and Reliability
223
Quality System Management
224
Quality Circles
225
Six Sigma
226
Selling Using and Supporting Engineering Products
228
Use and Maintenance
229
Maintenance Planning
230
Reliability Centred Maintenance
232
Total Productive Maintenance
233
Technology and Maintenance
235
Logistics Support
238
Conclusions
240
Engineering In Society
242
Education
243
Professional Institutions for Engineers
249
Management Training for Engineers
250
Green Engineering
252
Safety
253
Business Trends
255
Politics and Pearce
256
Nationality Culture and Government
259
The Changing World of Engineering
264
is Scientific Management Dead?
265
References and Bibliography
268
Index
269
Copyright

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Page xiii - ... nothing much you can do about it, because the reasons for your failure are within yourselves. Your firms are built on the Taylor model; even worse, so are your heads. With your bosses doing the thinking while the workers wield the screwdrivers, you're convinced deep down that this is the right way to run a business.
Page xiii - ... a real chance of success. Only by drawing on the combined brain power of all its employees can a firm face up to the turbulence and constraints of today's environment. This is why our large companies give their employees three to four times more training than yours, this is why they foster within the firm such...
Page xiii - With your bosses doing the thinking while the workers wield the screwdrivers, you're convinced deep down that this is the right way to run a business. For you, the essence of management is getting the ideas out of the heads of the bosses into the hands of labor.
Page xiii - We are beyond the Taylor model: business, we know, is now so complex and difficult, the survival of firms so hazardous in an environment increasingly unpredictable, competitive and fraught with danger, that their continued existence depends on the day-to-day mobilization of every ounce of intelligence.
Page xiii - For us, the core of management is precisely this art of mobilizing and pulling together the intellectual resources of all employees in the service of the firm. Because we have measured better than you the scope of the new technological and economic challenges, we know that the intelligence of a handful of technocrats, however brilliant and smart they may be, is no longer enough for a real chance of success.
Page xiii - ... success. Only by drawing on the combined brain power of all its employees can a firm face up to the turbulence and constraints of today's environment. This is why our large companies give their employees three to four times more training than yours; this is why they foster within the firm such intensive exchange and communication; this is why they seek constantly everybody's suggestions and why they demand from the educational system increasing numbers of graduates as well as bright and well-educated...

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