The New Statistical Account of Scotland: Dunbarton, Stirling, Clackmannan

Front Cover
W. Blackwood and Sons, 1845 - Scotland
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 11 - O how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ! The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields ; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of Heaven, O how canst thou renounce, and hope to be forgiven...
Page 6 - It would be with us what the ibis was with the Egyptians. When it has young, it will bring a mouse to the nest about every twelve or fifteen minutes.
Page 246 - Where cooling vapours breathe along the mead, The patient fisher takes his silent stand, Intent, his angle trembling in his hand : With looks unmoved, he hopes the scaly breed, And eyes the dancing cork and bending reed.
Page 1 - Quits mutton bones on grass to feast ; And see yon rooks, how odd their flight, They imitate the gliding kite, Or seem precipitate to fall, As if they felt the piercing ball. 'Twill surely...
Page 90 - I content me with my portuise and pontificall ; and if you, Dean Thomas, leave not these fantasies, you will repent when you cannot mend it. Dean Thomas answered, that he believed it was his duty to do what he did, and that he had laid his account with any danger that might follow.
Page 230 - No rocks impede thy dimpling course, That sweetly warbles o'er its bed, With white round polish'd pebbles spread; While, lightly poised, the scaly brood In myriads cleave thy crystal flood; The springing trout in speckled pride, The salmon, monarch of the tide; The ruthless pike, intent on war, The silver eel, and mottled par. Devolving from thy parent lake, A charming maze thy waters make, By bowers of birch and groves of pine, And hedges flower'd with eglantine.
Page 145 - What rendered this scene more striking and truly interesting was, that the body of her son and only child, the natural heir of the title and estates of Kilsyth, lay at her knee. His features were as composed as if he had been only asleep. His...
Page 222 - Hymnes or Sacred Songs, wherein the right use of poesie may be espied : whereunto are added the experience of the author's youth, and certain precepts...
Page 142 - A. The reason annexed to the third commandment is, That however the breakers of this commandment may escape punishment from men, yet the Lord our God will not suffer them to escape his righteous judgment.
Page 348 - Let nothing be done through strife or vain -glory; but in lowliness of mind let each esteem other better than themselves.

Bibliographic information