The New York Times Guide to Alternative Health

Front Cover
Macmillan, Jul 24, 2001 - Business & Economics - 394 pages
An indispensible resource for anyone interested in alternative medicine.

Nearly half the American population has at some point consulted a practitioner of complementary medicine -- a chiropractor or a specialist in acupuncture, homeopathy, massage therapy, or herbal or Chinese medicine. The amount of money spent on treatments and products in these areas is staggering, yet we still know little about their efficacy.

Adhering to the same high standards of investigation used by mainstream medical science, Jane Brody, Denise Grady, and the reporters of The New York Times take a hard look at the products, the research -- and the scams. They reveal the facts about unregulated dietary supplements, interactions between herbal and prescription medicines, and the many theories about the power of the mind over physical ailments. They evaluate claims about popular remedies like echinacea, ginkgo, and St. John's wort, and review the increasing body of scientific data on alternative treatments, including critical government case studies.

Contributors to this timely and authoritative guide include star writers of the health, science, and business pages of The New York Times, whose articles are prized by those seeking practical, reliable, well-researched reporting on vital health issues.
 

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The New York Times guide to alternative health: a consumer reference

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Brody, personal health columnist for the New York Times and author of several best-selling health and nutrition books, is here joined by Denise Grady, a science and health reporter for the New York ... Read full review

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I smoked for 20 years, October 2014 i was diagnosed of Emphysema my doctor told me there is no permanent cure for the disease, i was given bronchodilators to help me relax my bronchiolar muscles, I managed on with the disease till a friend told me about a herbal doctor from South Africa who sell herbal medicines to cure all kind of diseases including emphysema, I contacted this herbal doctor via his email and made purchase of the emphysema herbal medicine, i received the herbal medicine through DHL within 5 days, when i received the herbal medicine i applied it as prescribed and was totally cured of emphysema within 18-20 days of usage, the symptoms reduced till i even forgot i had emphysema, i went back to my doctor for diagnosis with spirometry and he confirmed i was free from the disease, contact this herbal doctor via his email drlusandaherbal@gmail.com or website on www(dot)drlusandaherbal(dot)weebly(dot)com 

Contents

Alternative
1
The Booming
33
Red Yeast Rice Redux
39
Cures Cancer Prevents AIDS Improves Sex Sorry
48
Tapping the Market in Morning Sickness
54
Some Help Some Harm Many Remain
60
In the Garden of Herbal Remedies Weeding Out
69
Mainstream Medicine Sifts
75
The MuscleBuilding Secret Is Out
150
The Arthritis
156
Bringing Sleep to the Blind
164
Whats It Good for Maybe? 174 Acupuncture Whats It Good for Maybe?
177
Learning Pilates One Stretch at a Time
185
A Mystical Exercise Regimen Draws
191
Rubdowns Are Fine Then Again They Can Get
199
The Mind Body Connection
202

Purveyor of Pill and Potion Mixes
84
Weed Whacks Depression
91
The High Price of Ephedras Buzz
98
Too Much Is Dangerous
124
Widespread Vitamin D Deficiency
132
No Help for Cancer
134
Other Supplements
142
Meditation Gains Ground Even in Hospitals
215
Cautionary Tales
278
Green Tea Without the Taste of Old Socks
340
And Soy May Not Even Be Best for Babies 350 And Soy May Not Even Be Best for Babies
352
Ups and Downs for Diet Guinea Pigs
359
The Latest Health Food but Hold the Clotted
368
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Jane E. Brody is the personal health columnist for The New York Times and the author of several bestselling books, including Jane Brody's Good Food Book and Jane Brody's Nutrition Book. She lives in New York City.

Denise Grady is a science and health reporter for the popular Science Times weekly section of The New York Times. She lives in New York City.

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