Descriptive Account of the Palace of Westminster

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Warrington & Company, 1869
 

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Page 33 - Undercroft, once a very richly ornamented and still a beautiful building, which is now being most carefully restored, and will again be used as a place of worship, being destined for- the numerous residents within the area of the New Palace, and when it is remembered that there are therein included some eighteen or twenty official residences, of different sizes, it will be seen that a need exists for some such provision. This Crypt has been sadly abused, while the beautiful Chapel above was occupied...
Page 5 - St. George of England, St. Andrew of Scotland, and St. Patrick of Ireland...
Page 22 - The three lowest panels have lions passant of England, carved and gilded, on a red ground, and above them, in a wide panel, arched and enriched with...
Page 30 - Except the Lord keep the House their labour is but lost that build it," given in the latin of the vulgate ; unique in its effect, and evidencing as do the pavements in this material in different parts of the building, that there is no lack...
Page 14 - Throne glowing with gold and colours ; the richly-carved panelling which lines the walls, with its gilded and emblazoned cove, and the balcony of brass, of light and elegant design, rising from the canopy ; the roof, most elaborately painted ; its massy beams and sculptured ornaments, and pendants richly gilded ; all unite in forming a scene of Royal magnificence as brilliant as it is unequalled.
Page 14 - Lords is 90 feet in length 45 in breadth, and of the same height. In plan, the House is divided into three parts; the northern and southern are each considerably smaller than the centre, which constitutes the, body or floor of the House, wherein are the woolsack, clerks' tables, &c., and on either side the scats for the peers, in rows.
Page 55 - The east end probably contained windows originally, as the chapel above undoubtedly did ; but, as the Palace now adjoins the east end of the crypt, no windows can now be obtained there. The panelling is therefore occupied with full length figures on gold grounds. Commencing from the left, in the first triplet are St. Oswald, St. Etheldreda, and St. Edmund ; those of the centre triplet are St. Peter and St. Stephen, the proto-martyr and titular saint of the old building; the centre panel being temporarily...

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