The Nicaragua Canal and the Monroe Doctrine: A Political History of Isthmus Transit, with Special Reference to the Nicaragua Canal Project and the Attitude of the United States Government Thereto

Front Cover
G. P. Putnam, 1896 - Monroe doctrine - 622 pages
 

Contents

The Mercantile System
25
Spains American Monopoly
26
FifteenthCentury Voyages of Discovery
29
The Discoveries of Columbus and his Contemporaries
30
The Popes Bull and the Treaty of Tordesillas
33
The New World Thought to be an Island
34
Spanish Colonial Expeditions to the Northwest
36
45 Events in Central America during the Period of the Great
45
Independent Action of the Several States in Regard to
63
CHAPTER III
71
The Freebooter Republic
77
Colonel Childss Surveys
83
The Accessory Transit Company
84
The British Maintain their Mosquito Protectorate and Re occupy Greytown
85
86 Costa Rican Claims
86
87 The Basis of Settlement
87
CHAPTER IV
88
Resolutions in Congress
89
90 Lord Clarendons Ultimatum
90
The Bombardment of Greytown
91
92 Walkers Filibustering Expedition
92
The Effect of the Seven Years War upon the English Settle
96
CHAPTER XII
113
PART
123
The United States as a New Factor in the Canal Problem
132
56 The Panama Mission
141
147
147
CHAPTER VII
149
Canal
158
Louis Philippes Canal Project
159
65 Louis Napoleons Interest in the Transit Question
161
CHAPTER VIII
164
The English Settlers and the Mosquito Indians
167
The English Claim to the Costa Rican Shore
170
Objections on the Part of the SpanishAmerican States
173
The Seizure of the San Juan
175
CHAPTER IX
185
American Operations in Tehuantepec
188
74 The Treaty with New Granada and the Panama Railway
190
The Compania de Transito de Nicaragua and the Hise Treaty
193
The American Atlantic and Pacific ShipCanal Company and the Squier Treaty with Nicaragua
196

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Page 125 - The question presented by the letters you have sent me, is the most momentous which has ever been offered to my contemplation since that of Independence. That made us a nation, this sets our compass and points the course which we are to steer through the ocean of time opening on us.
Page 591 - States; that no other tolls or charges shall be levied or collected upon the citizens of the United States, or their said merchandise thus passing over any road or canal that may be made by the Government of New Granada, or by the authority of the same, than is, under like circumstances, levied upon and collected from the Granadian citizens...
Page 125 - Our first and fundamental maxim should be, never to entangle ourselves in the broils of Europe ; our second, never to suffer Europe to intermeddle with cisatlantic affairs.
Page 595 - ... ratifications of this convention for concluding their arrangements, and presenting evidence of sufficient capital subscribed to accomplish the contemplated undertaking; it being understood that if, at the expiration of the aforesaid period, such persons or company be not able to commence and carry out the proposed enterprise, then the Governments of the United States and Great Britain shall be free to afford their protection to any other persons or company that shall be prepared to commence and...
Page 594 - V. The contracting parties further engage that, when the said Canal shall have been completed they will protect it from interruption, seizure or unjust confiscation, and that they will guarantee the neutrality thereof, so that the said Canal may forever lie open and free, and the capital invested therein, secure.
Page 595 - Britain determine to give their support and encouragement to such persons or company as may first offer to commence the same, with the necessary capital, the consent of the local authorities, and on such principles as accord with the spirit and intention of this convention...
Page 129 - An agreement between all the parties represented at the meeting, that each will guard, by its own means, against the establishment of any future European colony within its borders, may be found advisable.
Page 595 - And the contracting parties likewise agree that, each shall enter into Treaty stipulations with such of the Central American States, as they may deem advisable, for the purpose of more effectually carrying out the great design of this Convention, namely, — that of constructing and maintaining the said Canal as a ship-communication between the two Oceans for the benefit of mankind, on equal terms to all...
Page 592 - And, in order to secure to themselves the tranquil and constant enjoyment of these advantages, and as an especial compensation for the said advantages and for the favors they have acquired by the fourth, fifth and sixth articles of this treaty, the United States guarantee positively and efficaciously to New Granada...
Page 591 - The United States of America and the Republic of New Granada, desiring to make as durable as possible the relations which are to be established between the two parties by virtue of this treaty, have declared solemnly, and do agree to the following points: 1st.

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