The Novels of Jane Austen: Mansfield Park

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 235 - LET other pens dwell on guilt and misery. I quit such odious subjects as soon as I can, impatient to restore everybody, not greatly in fault themselves, to tolerable comfort, and to have done with all the rest.
Page 163 - Mansfield, no sounds of contention, no raised voice, no abrupt bursts, no tread of violence, was ever heard ; all proceeded in a regular course of cheerful orderliness ; everybody had their due importance ; everybody's feelings were consulted. If tenderness could be ever supposed wanting, good sense and good breeding supplied its place...
Page 248 - With so much true merit and true love, and no want of fortune and friends, the happiness of the married cousins must appear as secure as earthly happiness can be. Equally formed for domestic life, and attached to country pleasures, their home was the home of affection and comfort; and to complete the picture of good, the acquisition of Mansfield living, by the death of Dr Grant, occurred just after they had been married long enough to begin to want an increase of income, i and feel their distance...
Page 238 - He feared that principle, active principle, had been wanting, that they had never been properly taught to govern their inclinations and tempers, by that sense of duty which can alone suffice.
Page 212 - She sat in a blaze of oppressive heat, in a cloud of moving dust ; and her eyes could only wander from the walls marked by her father's head, to the table, cut and notched by her brothers, where stood the tea-board never thoroughly cleaned, the cups and saucers wiped in streaks, the milk a mixture of motes floating in thin blue, and the bread and butter growing every minute more greasy than 383 even Rebecca's hands had first produced it...
Page 11 - continued Sir Thomas. " His going, though only eight miles, will be an unwelcome contraction of our family circle; but I should have been deeply mortified if any son of mine could reconcile himself to doing less. It is perfectly natural that you should not have thought much on the subject, Mr. Crawford. But a parish has wants and claims which can be known only by a clergyman constantly resident, and which no proxy can be capable of satisfying to the same extent.
Page 235 - My Fanny, indeed, at this very time, I have the satisfaction of knowing, must have been happy in spite of every thing. She must have been a happy creature in spite of all that she felt, or thought she felt, for the distress of those around her.
Page 85 - ... immediately and peremptorily, and without paying my opinion or my regard the compliment of any consultation, put a decided negative on it. I should have been much surprised, and much hurt, by such a proceeding. I should have thought it a gross violation of duty and respect. You are not to be judged by the same rule. You do not owe me the duty of a child. But, Fanny, if your heart can acquit you of ingratitude
Page 6 - The game was her's, and only did not pay her for what she had given to secure it.
Page 183 - I am considering your sister's health," said he, addressing himself to Susan, " which I think the confinement of Portsmouth unfavourable to. She requires constant air and exercise. When you know her as well as I do, I am sure you will agree that she does, and that she ought never to be long banished from the free air and liberty of the country.

Bibliographic information