The Novels of Jane Austen: Northanger Abbey

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Contents

I
1
II
6
III
13
IV
18
V
23
VI
27
VII
32
VIII
41
XVII
127
XVIII
132
XIX
138
XX
143
XXI
153
XXII
162
XXIII
173
XXIV
181

IX
50
X
60
XI
72
XII
82
XIII
88
XIV
98
XV
108
XVI
118
XXV
190
XXVI
199
XXVII
207
XXVIII
211
XXIX
222
XXX
232
XXXI
241

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Page 189 - Charming as were all Mrs. Radcliffe's works, and charming even as were the works of all her imitators, it was not in them perhaps that human nature, at least in the midland counties of England, was to be looked for.
Page 26 - From pride, ignorance, or fashion, our foes are almost as many as our readers ; and while the abilities of the ninehundredth abridger of the History of England, or of the man who collects and publishes in a volume some dozen lines of Milton, Pope, and Prior, with a paper from the Spectator, and a chapter from Sterne...
Page 26 - replies the young lady ; while she lays down her book with affected indifference, or momentary shame. ". It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda;" or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best-chosen language.
Page 4 - It is a delightful task To teach the young idea how to shoot1' And from Shakspeare she gained a great store of information : amongst the rest, that "Trifles light as air, Are, to the jealous, confirmation strong, As proofs of Holy Writ.
Page 1 - NO one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy would have supposed her born to be an heroine. Her situation in life, the character of her father and mother, her own person and disposition, were all equally against her.
Page 106 - ... she immediately pictured to herself a mob of three thousand men assembling in St. George's Fields . the Bank attacked, the Tower threatened, the streets of London flowing with blood, a detachment of the...
Page 99 - But I really thought before, young men despised novels amazingly." "It is amazingly; it may well suggest amazement if they do - for they read nearly as many as women. I myself have read hundreds and hundreds. Do not imagine that you can cope with me in a knowledge of Julias and Louisas. If we proceed to particulars, and engage in the never-ceasing inquiry of 'Have you read this?
Page 8 - Mrs Allen was one of that numerous class of females, whose society can raise no other emotion than surprise at there being any men in the world who could like them well enough to marry them.
Page 104 - Delighted with her progress, and fearful of wearying her with too much wisdom at once, Henry suffered the subject to decline, and by an easy transition from a piece of rocky fragment and the withered oak which he had placed near its summit, to oaks in general, to forests, the inclosure of them, waste lands, crown lands and government, he shortly found himself arrived at politics ; and from politics, it was an easy step to silence.
Page 201 - Henry's, she was very soon obliged to give him credit for being right, however disagreeable to her his going. But the inexplicability of the General's conduct dwelt much on her thoughts. That he was very particular in his eating, she had, by her own unassisted observation, already discovered; but why he should say one thing so positively, and mean another all the while, was most unaccountable! How were people, at that rate, to be understood ? Who but Henry could have been aware of what his father...

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