The Novels of Mrs. Oliphant: A Subversive View of Traditional Themes

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P. Lang, 1994 - Literary Criticism - 343 pages
Margarete Oliphant (1828-1897) has long been decried as a conventional hack. This study shows that she was, in fact, an original and quite subversive writer, who radically re-interpreted traditional motifs and challenged values and ideals sacrosanct to the age. In her novels she turned upside down Victorian stereotypes of gender roles, marriage and family hierarchy, presented religious questions, death-bed scenes and the hereafter from a new and unconventional angle, and in her portrayal dispensed with models almost all of her contemporaries were content to follow. She deserves a permanent place in the gallery of nineteenth-century authors.

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Contents

Introduction
1
FORMAL CONSIDERATIONS
17
THE ROLE OF THE INDIVIDUAL IN SOCIETY
89
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

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About the author (1994)

The Author: Margarete Rubik is an associate professor of English and American Literature at the University of Vienna. An Austrian citizen, she received an M.A. in American Studies from the University of Southern California and a Ph.D. in English as well as an M.A. in History from the University of Vienna. She has published widely in journals about Victorian and twentieth-century literature.

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