The Nutrition Transition: Diet and Disease in the Developing World

Front Cover
Elsevier, Aug 30, 2002 - Technology & Engineering - 276 pages

This book deals with the dramatic changes in diet and lifestyle that are occurring in the developing world as a result of globalization, and their impact on human healt. The Editors have assembled a leading group of scientists in teh fields of economics, population sciences, international health, medicine, nutrition and food sciences, to address each of the key issues related to the changes in demographic trends, food production and marketing, and disease patterns in the developing world.

The Nutrition Transition provides essential information to understand the far-reaching effects that global economic, social and cultural trends are having on diet-related disease patersin in countries of transition.

  • Contains numerous illustrative figures and tables
  • Two case studies included-on China and Brazil
  • Foreword written by Nevin Scrimshaw, recipient of the World Food Prize
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Biological Factors Affecting the Nutrition Transition
109
Index
251

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ii - Bruce Chassy University of Illinois, USA Patrick Fox University College Cork, Republic of Ireland Dennis Gordon North Dakota State University, USA Robert Hutkins University of Nebraska, USA Ronald S.Jackson Quebec, Canada Daryl B.
Page 1 - One relates to the demographic transition — the shift from a pattern of high fertility and high mortality to one of low fertility and low mortality (typical of modern industrialized nations).
Page i - Food Science and Technology International Series Series Editor Steve L Taylor University of Nebraska...
Page xiii - Level (UL) are determined by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences.
Page 10 - Study of the causes of this decline point to the existence of a synergism between technological and physiological improvements that has produced a form of human evolution that is biological but not genetic, rapid, culturally transmitted, and not necessarily stable.
Page 12 - ... of heavy work). Although the English situation was somewhat better, the bottom 3% of its labor force lacked the energy for any work, but the balance of the bottom 20% had enough energy for about 6 h of light work ( 1 .09 h of heavy work) each day.

About the author (2002)

Dr. Caballero is Professor of International Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Professor of Pediatrics at the School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University. He has over 20 years of experience as a scholar, researcher and leader in the area of child health and nutrition. He obtained his MD from the University of Buenos Aires and his PhD (in neuroendocrine regulation) from MIT. He started his faculty career at Harvard Medical School, and moved to Johns Hopkins in 1990 to found the Center for Human Nutrition.

Dr. Caballero is a recognized expert on the nutritional needs of children and adults, and on nutrient requirements in undernourished populations. For the past 10 years, he has focused on the problem of childhood obesity in the US and in developing countries, and explored the impact of dietary transition and globalization on health indicators. He is an active participant in key scientific committees advising the US government on issues of diet and health, including the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) Committee, the Expert Panel on Macronutrient Requirements, and the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences. He was a member of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans Advisory Committee, and is currently a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI).

Dr. Caballero is an active leader in the area of global health, specifically on diet, lifestyle and disease risk. He is Chairman of the Board of the Pan American Health and Education Foundation, in Washington, D.C., and member of the Board of Directors of the International Nutrition Foundation, in Boston, MA. He is a member of the Steering Committee of the Centers of Excellence Network of the Global Health Initiative, National Institutes of Health. Recent awards include the Ancel Keys Prize for achievements in international public health and the Thompson-Beaudette Lectureship from Rutgers University. In 2011 he was named to the Spanish Academy of Nutritional Sciences.

Dr. Caballero is the author of over 150 scientific publications. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Food Sciences and Nutrition, a 10-volume work on food production, consumption and biological effects. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition, which received the Book of the Year Award from the British Medical Association. His Guide to Dietary Supplements summarizes the current scientific basis for the use of mineral and vitamin supplements. His book The Nutrition Transition: Diet and Disease in the Developing World explored the impact of demographic and economic development on diet- and lifestyle-related diseases in developing countries. His book Obesity in China summarizes research conducted in rural and urban China to track the impact of socioeconomic development on health outcomes. He is also co-editor of the most widely used textbook in human nutrition, Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease.

Bibliographic information