The O'Briens and the O'Flahertys: A National Tale, Volume 4

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 102 - Ye good fellows all, Who love to be told where there's claret good store, Attend to the call of one who's ne'er frighted, But greatly delighted with six bottles more : Be sure you don't pass the good house Monyglas, Which the jolly red god so peculiarly owns; 'Twill well suit your humour, for pray what would you more, Than mirth with good claret, and bumpers, Squire Jones...
Page 245 - Here the fortitude of long endurance corrupts into obsequiousness; and the spirit of the gallant maddens into lawless intemperance. Here genius is the object of suspicion to dull rulers, and of insult to petty underlings; and all that bends not...
Page 229 - The observed of all observers, quite, quite down! And I, of ladies most deject and wretched, That suck'd the honey of his music vows, Now see that noble and most sovereign reason, Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh...
Page 99 - Had I a heart for falsehood framed, I ne'er could injure you; For though your tongue no promise claim'd, Your charms would make me true. To you no soul shall bear deceit, No stranger offer wrong; But friends in all the aged you'll meet, And lovers in the young.
Page 76 - Reynière ; and it required no skill in augury to divine, that the claret would be out before the company. " All were now occupied with eating, drinking, talking, laughing, helping and being helped ; while old-fashioned breeding disposed every guest to be cordially at the service of his neighbour :—' Allow me to trouble you for a slice of your round, rather rare / * was answered by, ' Sir, the trouble's a pleasure.
Page 74 - Sixty persons to be seated, where there was not comfortable accommodation for half the number, required no little pains and ingenuity: and the horse-shoe table would have been very inadequate to the wants of the guests, but for the never failing aid of the side-board, sidetables, and window stools, which with a " plate on the knee," and a " bit in the corner,11 at last providing for all.
Page 283 - ... slept over the degradation of their caste, and were ignorant or unmoved by the events which were passing in the distant capital. Six hundred years of oppression were now producing their moral effects. The conscientious notions of passive obedience of the catholic, were then fortified by the seared and...
Page 63 - ... upon which several ladies were seated, chatting and laughing with the most perfect ease and frankness, neither silenced nor interrupted by the approach of the noble stranger. Every seat in the room, indeed, was occupied by the female guests, while the men stood in groups in the centre and near the door, with all the propriety of separation observed in a cathedral. All, however, talked gaily and unreservedly : no rustic bashfulness, none of the awkward reserve and vulgar timidity usually observable...
Page 64 - Every eye beamed life, and every countenance was full of intelligence, and though the brogue of many was sufficiently obvious, and the prettiest lips made weavers rhyme to savours, meat to fate, and mean to gain, (as Swift did long after he had associated with the Barleys and the Bolingbrokes) yet to voices as soft as the smiles that accompanied them, much might be forgiven on the score of mere pronunciation.
Page 75 - O'Flaherty, presided as the representative of the late Brigadier ; while Miss Mable, supported by a Joyce, and a Blake, did the honours at the further extremity. " Grace being sakl by the minister of the established church (while the Roman catholic guests cast down their eyes, moved their lips, and crossed themselves 'under the table-cloth, with a bashful and proscribed look,) — Miss Mac Taaf stood up, and with a cordial welcome in her eye, said aloud, ' Much good may it do ye all ; ' to which...

Bibliographic information