The O'Briens and the O'Flahertys: A National Tale, Volume 2

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Page 167 - Her needle doth So sanctify my cushionets: besides My smock-sleeves have such holy embroideries And are so learned, that I fear in time All my apparel will be quoted by Some pure instructor.
Page 1 - Meanwhile welcome Joy, and Feast, Midnight Shout and Revelry, Tipsy Dance and Jollity. Braid your locks with rosy twine, Dropping odours, dropping wine Rigour now is gone to bed, And Advice with scrupulous head, Strict Age, and sour Severity, With their grave saws in slumber lie.
Page 269 - Out of every corner of the woods and glynns they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them ; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves ; they did eat the dead carrions, happy where they could find them...
Page 212 - Knowing nothing of modern Ireland, but her sufferings and her wrongs ; knowing little of ancient Ireland, but her fables and her dreams...
Page 27 - Hindon, a Peer of the United Kingdom, a Member of her Britannic Majesty's most Honourable Privy Council, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, her Britannic Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs...
Page 217 - Various," the author tells us, "are the opinions concerning the first mortal that set a foot upon this island. We are told by some that three of the daughters of Cain arrived here, several hundred years before the Deluge. The white book, which in the Irish is called Leabhar Dhroma Sneachta, informs us that the oldest of these daughters was called Banba, and gave a name to the whole kingdom. After these, we are told that three men and fifty women arrived in the island; one of them was called Ladhra,...
Page 257 - ... their boasted learning a tissue of monkish legends; their government, the rudest form of the worst of human institutions...
Page 220 - ... detect the falsehood of it. I must own there is a very good reason for me to believe, that there was a very old man, in the time of St. Patrick, who lived some hundred years before, and gave him a particular account of the history of the island...
Page 125 - ... nur zu äufserlichen zwecken verwendet worden zu sein. So war der held mit anwesend bei der denkwürdigen Versammlung im ballhause in Versaille , ' " when they swore never to seperate, till they give a constitution to their country, founded upon the overthrow of those oligarchical privileges in church and state, which had been alike fatal to the independence of the king and to the rights of the people.
Page 170 - ... through the streets of St. Grellan, saw the most faithful copy of an Italian Monsignore ever exhibited beyond the Roman corso : — all purple and pertness, pious priggery and foppish formality, with a beetling brow, and the best flapped hat that ever was perched upon three hairs of the erect head of a high, haughty, and overbearing churchman, — the genius of caricature could have added nothing to the picture. Lord Chesterfield has said, that " of all men who can read and write, a parson is,...

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