The Odyssey

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Collins Harvill, 1961 - Poetry - 474 pages
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Review: The Odyssey

User Review  - Golnaz Taherian - Goodreads

Read this book twice and still cant get over it. It's is one of those books you want to read over and over. Read full review

Review: The Odyssey

User Review  - Rima I - Goodreads

There were a lot of parts that I liked and a lot of parts that I didn't like. It was very hard to get into the book initially....and the difficult names didn't help! However as I kept reading I found ... Read full review

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Contents

Book One
13
Book Two
31
Book Three
47
Book Four
65
Book Five
93
Book Six
111
Book Eight
137
Book Nine
157
Book Fourteen
259
Book Fifteen
279
Book Sixteen
301
Book Seventeen
321
Book Eighteen
347
Book Nineteen
365
SIGNS AND A VISION
387
Book Twentyone
403

THE GRACE OF THE WITCH
177
Book Eleven
197
Book Twelve
221
Book Thirteen
241
Book Twentytwo
421
Book Twentythree
441
Book Twentyfour
457
Copyright

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About the author (1961)

Homer is the author of The Iliad and The Odyssey, the two greatest Greek epic poems. Nothing is known about Homer personally; it is not even known for certain whether there is only one true author of these two works. Homer is thought to have been an Ionian from the 9th or 8th century B.C. While historians argue over the man, his impact on literature, history, and philosophy is so significant as to be almost immeasurable. The Iliad relates the tale of the Trojan War, about the war between Greece and Troy, brought about by the kidnapping of the beautiful Greek princess, Helen, by Paris. It tells of the exploits of such legendary figures as Achilles, Ajax, and Odysseus. The Odyssey recounts the subsequent return of the Greek hero Odysseus after the defeat of the Trojans. On his return trip, Odysseus braves such terrors as the Cyclops, a one-eyed monster; the Sirens, beautiful temptresses; and Scylla and Charybdis, a deadly rock and whirlpool. Waiting for him at home is his wife who has remained faithful during his years in the war. Both the Iliad and the Odyssey have had numerous adaptations, including several film versions of each.

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