The Order Microsauria

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American Philosophical Society, 1978 - Amphibians, Fossil - 211 pages
 

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Contents

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Page 10 - American Museum of Natural History, New York; British Museum (Natural History), London...
Page 209 - EH (1969) Skulls of Gymnophiona and their significance in the taxonomy of the group. Univ Kansas Sci Bull 48:585-687.
Page 209 - Vaughn, PP, 1969, Upper Pennsylvanian vertebrates from the Sangre de Cristo Formation of central Colorado: Los Angeles County Museum Contr. Science no. 164, 28 p. 1972, More vertebrates, including a new microsaur, from the Upper Pennsylvanian of central Colorado: Los Angeles County Museum Contr.
Page 209 - SZARSKI, H. 1962. The origin of the Amphibia.
Page 78 - ... described, number 11,156 of the Museum of Paleontology of the University of Michigan, correspond very closely with those of the type specimen of Ostodolepis brevispinatus, and the specimen is referred to that genus and species. It was obtained from the University of Chicago, about 1912, in exchange, and in all probability came from the same locality and geological horizon as the type specimen.
Page 23 - The remainder of the hind limb is not preserved in any of the specimens. The limbs are fairly large in proportion to the remainder of the body, and the portions preserved are well ossified. There can be no doubt that, despite the possible retention of relics of the lateral line grooves, Asaphestera was a primarily terrestrial animal.
Page 209 - Stovall, JW, LI Price, and AS Romer. 1966. The postcranial skeleton of the giant Permian pelycosaur Cotylorhynchus romeri.
Page 21 - The squamosal and quadratojugal form the posterior margin of the sides of the skull and extend unsculptured portions over the occipital surface, as do these bones in the gymnarthrids and Pantylus. The cheek region is relatively short, with a "tall
Page 21 - The teeth are similar in size and number to those in the maxilla, but are covered externally for a large portion of their length by the dentary. This makes an exact tooth count impossible since some of the posterior teeth are apparently completely obscured.

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