The Oriental Herald, Volume 15

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 22 - His life was gentle, and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, 'This was a man!
Page 290 - For Englishmen are no more to be slaves to parliaments " than to kings — our name is Legion, and we are many.
Page 449 - And they who, to be sure of Paradise, Dying put on the weeds of Dominic, Or in Franciscan think to pass disguised.
Page 199 - ... the latter as the legal dialect of public transactions. Those who united letters with business were equally conversant with both; and it was almost impossible, in any province, to find a Roman subject of a liberal education, who was at once a stranger to the Greek and to the Latin language. It was by such institutions that the nations of the empire insensibly melted away into the Roman name and people.
Page 517 - I pass over many anonymous letters I have received. Those in print are public: and some of them have been brought judicially before the Court. Whoever the writers are, they take the wrong way. I will do my duty, unawed. What am I to fear? That mendax infamia from the press, which daily coins false facts and false motives?
Page 434 - Bengal, from time to time, to make and issue such rules, ordinances, and regulations, for the good order and civil government...
Page 285 - ... speaking or writing contemptuously of the court, or judges, acting in their judicial capacity; by printing false accounts (or even true ones without proper permission) of causes then depending in judgment; and by...
Page 402 - emaciate her body, by living voluntarily on pure flowers, roots, and fruit; but let her not, when her lord is deceased, even pronounce the name of another man. Let her continue, till death, forgiving all injuries, performing harsh duties, avoiding every sensual pleasure, and cheerfully practising the incomparable rules of virtue, which have been followed by such women as were devoted to one only husband.
Page 199 - The ancient dialects of Italy, the Sabine, the Etruscan, and the Venetian, sunk into oblivion; but in the provinces, the east was less docile than the west, to the voice of its victorious preceptors. This obvious difference...
Page 470 - tis his voice! — from your saddles alight; He's at bay in the brushwood preparing for fight. Leave the horses behind — and be still every man: Let the Mullers and Kennies advance in the van: Keep fast in your ranks; — by the yell of yon hound, The savage, I guess, will be out — with a bound. He comes! the tall jungle before him loud crashing, His mane bristled fiercely, his fiery eyes flashing; With a roar of disdain, he leaps forth in his wrath, To challenge the foe that dare 'leaguer his...

Bibliographic information