The Other Fact of Life: Taking Control of Menopause

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Allen & Unwin, 2001 - Menopause - 268 pages
The latest medical research on menopause, and an insight into the experience of some extraordinary Australian women.
 

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Contents

Hormones
13
Wellbeing across cultures
33
Mood changes
44
Hormone replacement therapy
55
Alternative therapies and supplements
69
Diabetes
92
The breast
104
Osteoporosis
127
Cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women
148
Arthritis
167
Exercise why do it?
181
Food for thought
199
Common problems and questions
215
Sexuality
231
Alzheimers disease
243
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 253 - Cummings SR, Eckert S, Krueger KA et al. The effect of raloxifene on risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women: results from the MORE randomized trial.
Page 252 - Black DM, Cummings SR, Karpf DB, et al. Randomised trial of effect of alendronate on risk of fracture in women with existing vertebral fractures.
Page 256 - McClung MR, Geusens P, Miller PD et al. Effect of risedronate on the risk of hip fracture in elderly women. Hip Intervention Program Study Group.
Page 256 - Effect of alendronate on limited-activity days and bed-disability days caused by back pain in postmenopausal women with existing vertebral fractures.
Page 251 - L, et al. Estrogen replacement therapy decreases hyperandrogenicity and improves glucose homeostasis and plasma lipids in postmenopausal women with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
Page 159 - It is calculated by dividing your weight in kilograms by the square of your height in metres. A 'normal' BMI value is between 20 and 25.
Page 105 - ... gland until the thyroxine is needed by the body. Then the thyroglobulin is hydrolyzed, or split, and the thyroxine released into the bloodstream. Most, if not all, of these steps in the iodine cycle are carried out under the direction of a hormone called thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). This hormone is produced by the pituitary' gland, a small gland at the base of the brain.
Page 252 - ML (1997) Natural and synthetic isoflavones in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases.
Page 252 - JC (1990). A case-control study of Alzheimer's disease in Australia. Neurology, 40, 1698-707.
Page 253 - Fisher B, Highlights from recent National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project studies in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. CA Cancer J Clin 1999; 49: 159.

About the author (2001)

Robyn Craven is Medical Director at Freemasons Women's Health and Breast Clinics, Senior Lecturer at Monash University's Department of General Practice and Consultant at the Osteoporosis Clinic, Royal Melbourne Hospital...Lily Stojanovska is Associate Professor at Victoria University where her activities include supervising master and doctorate students in the areas of menopause and diabetes. Her science background has given her a wide knowledge in the area of human physiology and nutrition while her masters and doctoral training have provided her with specific understanding of various disease-related conditions.

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