The Ottawa Naturalist, Volumes 14-15

Front Cover
Ottawa Field-Naturalists' Club., 1900 - Natural history
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 34 - The sculpture consists of round fossa", which are deeply impressed and are arranged quincuncially, so that their borders never form straight lines. The latter are also more or less angulate on the edge, so that the surface has a more than usually rugose character.
Page 46 - ... Report 13) A141-143, 1901. In French pages 163166 (1900) Note on the glaciation of Mount Orford, Quebec. Canadian Record of Science, volume 8, pages 223-225 (1901) A hornblende lamprophyre dike at Richmond, Quebec. Canadian Record of Science, volume 8, pages 315-320 (1901) A preliminary note on an amygdaloidal trap rock in the Eastern Townships of the Province of Quebec. Ottawa Naturalist, volume 14, pages 180-182 (1901) On the petrography of Mount Orford, Quebec. American Geologist, volume 27,...
Page 34 - Compxeinys variolosus, and described as follows:" One of the most abundant, and the largest species of the Fort Union beds. The carapace is convex and the plastron flat; the marginal bones are heavy and strongly convex on the inferior side. The margin of the plastron is thickened and heavy — characters which also belong to all parts of the carapace. The sutures of the dermal scuta are deeply impressed, and the surface of the bone is strongly sculptured above and below and even on the superior face...
Page 66 - ... running expenses of the institution is made up by annual subscriptions. Each year, any surplus on hand is put aside as a nucleus for an endowment fund. It treats annually from 120 to 130 patients, and its annual reports show that twenty-five per cent of these are apparently cured; while twenty-five to thirty per cent more are sufficiently restored in health to resume their work or support themselves by their own efforts while living in a suitable climate. Starting eight years ago with less than...
Page 46 - A condensed summary of the field work annually accomplished by the officers of the Geological Survey of Canada from its commencement to 1865. Ottawa Nat., vol. xiv, pp. 107-118, 1900. 1534
Page 34 - ... The carapace is convex and the plastron flat; the marginal bones are heavy and strongly convex on the inferior side. The margin of the plastron is thickened and heavy — characters which also belong to all parts of the carapace. The sutures of the dermal scuta are deeply impressed, and the surface of the bone is strongly sculptured above and below and even on the superior face of the thickened margins of the free lobes of the plastron. The sculpture consists of round fossa1, which are deeply...
Page 12 - ... Sc. from Princeton in 1877 and the degree of LL. D. from Queen's University in 1890 and from McGill University in 1891. In the same year he was awarded the Bigsby gold medal by the Geological Society of London for his services to the science of geology, and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. In 1893 he was elected President of the Royal Society of Canada. In 1896 he was President of the Geological Section of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, at its Toronto meeting,...
Page 15 - Lists of these fossils, most of which are identical with well-known Corniferous species, were published in the ' ' Reports of Progress of the Geological Survey of Canada" for 1875-76 and 1877-78. For many years a number of fossils from the Devonian rocks of the Albany River at Old Fort Henley and of the Moose River, collected by the late Mr. George Barnston about 1834 or 1835, have been in the Museum of the Canadian Survey, but nothing appears to have been published about...
Page 9 - Mr. bowter, discovered a beach workshop on the Quebec side of the Ottawa River just below the little Chaudiere Rapids. The workshop extends along the whole west shore of Squaw Bay from the southerly end of Mountain street in Tdtreauville, a distance of about 800 feet.
Page 98 - The only consolation we can find is the conviction, borne in upon us by ample and painful experience, that a very large mass of the geological writing of the present time is utterly worthless for any of the higher purposes of the science, and that it may quite safely and profitably, both as regards time and temper, be left unread.

Bibliographic information