The Oxfam Education Report

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Oxfam, Jan 1, 2000 - Education - 403 pages
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This major new book provides a hard-hitting analysis of the state of basic education provision across the world, more than fifty years after the Universal Declaration on Human Rights established education as a fundamental right. Today millions of children are denied the education they need to escape poverty. This book sets out the scale of the problem, identifies some of its underlying causes, and provides an agenda for reform, including the imaginative Global Action Plan for basic education.

"The Oxfam Education Report" develops a new analytical tool to evaluate education provision: the Education Performance Index (EPI). This ranks countries by their performance in three key areas: enrollment in school; completion of education; and gender equity, and demonstrates that low incomes need not be barriers towards universal primary education.

While using generally-available data from international organizations, "The Oxfam
Education Report" skillfully integrates the stories and experiences of individuals, of small communities, and of NGO groups to focus on the reality of education provision, and makes a unique contribution to the growing debate about achieving the target of universal primary education by 2015.
 

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Page 233 - Each State Party to the present Covenant undertakes to take steps, individually and through international assistance and co-operation, especially economic and technical, to the maximum of its available resources, with a view to achieving progressively the full realization of the rights recognized in the present Covenant by all appropriate means, including particularly the adoption of legislative measures.
Page 172 - Parties recognize the right of the child to education, and with a view to achieving this right progressively and on the basis of equal opportunity, they shall, in particular (a) make primary education compulsory and available free to all...
Page 15 - And a few voices are lifted up in favour of the doctrine that the masses should be educated because they are men and women with unlimited capacities of being, doing, and suffering, and that it is as true now, as ever it was, that the people perish for lack of knowledge.
Page 65 - Is it not almost a self-evident axiom, that the State should require and compel the education, up to a certain standard, of every human being who is born its citizen...
Page 15 - The clergy join in the cry for education, for they affirm that the people are drifting away from church and chapel into the broadest infidelity. The manufacturers and the capitalists swell the chorus lustily. They declare that ignorance makes bad workmen; that England will soon be unable to turn out cotton goods, or steam engines, cheaper than other people; and then, Ichabod!
Page 15 - you must educate the masses because they are going to be masters." The clergy join in the cry for education, for they affirm that the people are drifting away from church and chapel into the broadest infidelity. The manufacturers and the capitalists swell the chorus lustily. They declare that ignorance makes bad workmen ; that England will soon be unable to turn out cotton goods, or steam engines...
Page 102 - States Parties agree that the education of the child shall be directed to: a. the development of the child's personality, talents and mental and physical abilities to their fullest potential; b.
Page 64 - ... all the above cases are provided for, there will still be a number of families who, though not properly of the class of poor, yet find it difficult to give education to their children; and such children, under such a case, would be in a worse condition than if their parents were actually poor. A nation, under a well-regulated government, should permit none to remain uninstructed.
Page 120 - ... those with special educational needs must have access to regular schools which should accommodate them within a child-centred pedagogy capable of meeting these needs; • regular schools with this inclusive orientation are the most effective means of combating discriminatory attitudes, creating welcoming communities, building an inclusive society, and achieving education for all...
Page 357 - A Contribution to the Theory of Economic Growth," Quarterly Journal of Economics 70 (February 1956): 65—94.

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About the author (2000)

Kevin Watkins is Oxfam GB's Senior Adviser on Finance and Social Policy.

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