The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy

Front Cover
Christer Bruun, J. C. Edmondson
Oxford University Press, 2015 - Art - 888 pages
Epigraphy, or the study of inscriptions, is critical for anyone seeking to understand the Roman world, whether they regard themselves as literary scholars, historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, religious scholars or work in a field that touches on the Roman world from c. 500 BCE to 500
CE and beyond. The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy is the fullest collection of scholarship on the study and history of Latin epigraphy produced to date. Rather that just a collection of inscriptions, however, this volume seeks to show why inscriptions matter and demonstrate to classicists and
ancient historians how to work with the sources. To that end, the 35 chapters, written by senior and rising scholars in Roman history, classics, and epigraphy, cover everything from typograph to the importance of inscriptions for understanding many aspects of Roman culture, from Roman public life,
to slavery, to the roles and lives of women, to the military, and to life in the provinces. Students and scholars alike will find the Handbook a crritical tool for expanding their knowledge of the Roman world.
 

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Contents

1 The Epigrapher at Work
3
The Contribution of Manuscripts
21
3 Forgeries and Fakes
42
4 The Major Corpora and Epigraphic Publications
66
5 Epigraphy and Digital Resources
78
PART II Inscriptions in the Roman World
87
The Main Types of Inscriptions
89
Officinae Layout and Carving Techniques
111
23 Social Life in Town and Country
495
24 Urban Infrastructure and Euergetism outside the City of Rome
515
25 Spectacle in Rome Italy and the Provinces
537
26 Roman Family History
559
27 Women in the Roman World
582
28 Slaves and Freed Slaves
605
29 Death and Burial
627
30 Communications and Mobility in the Roman Empire
649

8 The Epigraphic Habit in the Roman World
131
PART III The Value of Inscriptions for Reconstructing the Roman World
149
9 The Roman Republic
153
10 The Roman Emperor and the Imperial Family
178
Prosopography
202
12 Local Elites in Italy and the Western Provinces
227
13 Local Elites in the Greek East
250
14 Roman Government and Administration
274
Laws Lawmaking and Legal Documents
299
16 The Roman Army
319
17 Inscriptions and the Narrative of Roman History
345
18 Late Antiquity
364
Inscriptions and Religion in the Roman Empire
395
19 Religion in Rome and Italy
397
20 Religion in the Roman Provinces
420
21 The Rise of Christianity
445
Inscriptions and Roman Social and Economic Life
469
22 The City of Rome
471
31 Economic Life in the Roman Empire
671
Inscriptions and Roman Cultural Life
697
32 Local Languages in Italy and the West
699
33 Linguistic Variation Language Change and Latin Inscriptions
721
34 Inscriptions and Literacy
745
35 Carmina Latina Epigraphica
764
The Leiden System
785
Appendix II Epigraphic Abbreviations
787
Appendix III Roman Onomastics
799
Appendix IV Roman Kinship Terms
807
Appendix V Roman Voting Tribes
811
Appendix VI Roman Numbers
813
Appendix VII List of Digital Resources
815
Illustration Credits
817
Index Of Source
821
General Index
851
Copyright

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About the author (2015)


Christer Bruun is Professor of Classics at the University of Toronto.

Jonathan Edmondson is Professor of History at York University.

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