The Page Turner: A Novel

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1999 - Fiction - 244 pages
2 Reviews
At the age of eighteen Paul Porterfield dreams of playing piano at the world's great concert halls, yet the closest he's come has been to turn pages for his idol, Richard Kennington, a former prodigy who is entering middle age. The two begin a love affair that affects their lives in ways neither could have predicted. "Absorbing from start to finish" (The New Yorker), The Page Turner testifies to the tenacity of the human spirit and the resiliency of the human heart.
 

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The page turner: a novel

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Leavitt, in his first novel since the controversial While England Sleeps (Houghton, 1995), proves once again that he can accomplish much through his clean, spare narrative style. A master at creating ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
23
Section 3
30
Section 4
33
Section 5
43
Section 6
57
Section 7
69
Section 8
83
Section 13
137
Section 14
161
Section 15
169
Section 16
175
Section 17
185
Section 18
199
Section 19
205
Section 20
217

Section 9
95
Section 10
107
Section 11
113
Section 12
121
Section 21
227
Section 22
233
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

David Leavitt's first collection of stories, Family Dancing, was published when he was just twenty-three and was a finalist for both the National Book Critics Circle Award and the PEN/Faulkner Prize. The Lost Language of Cranes was made into a BBC film, and While England Sleeps was short-listed for the Los Angeles Times Fiction Prize. With Mark Mitchell, he coedited The Penguin Book of Short Stories, Pages Passed from Hand to Hand, and cowrote Italian Pleasures. Leavitt is a recipient of fellowships from both the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. He divides his time between Italy and Florida.

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