The Papers of Will Rogers: From vaudeville to Broadway : September 1908-August 1915

Cover
University of Oklahoma Press, 01.05.2001 - 544 Seiten

This third volume of The Papers of Will Rogers documents the evolution of Rogers's vaudeville career as well as the newlywed life of Will and Betty Blake Rogers and the birth of their children. During these years, the Rogerses moved to New York City, and after many years of performing with Buck McKee and horse Teddy, Rogers began a solo act in vaudeville as a talking, roping cowboy. He appeared on the same playbill with such performers as Fred Stone, Eddie Cantor, and Houdini, and his stage career expanded to include an appearance in the Broadway musical comedy "The Wall Street Girl." Volume Three ends with Rogers's successful transition from vaudeville to Broadway, on the brink of his breakthrough as a star of the Ziegfeld Follies.

 

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The papers of Will Rogers

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The commencement of this six-volume set of the papers of Will Rogers, edited by veterans of several projects documenting American studies and performing arts, is indicative of his emergence as ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

CHRONOLOGY SEPTEMBER 1908AUGUST 1915
9
EDITORIAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES
29
Introduction
43
Program cover Orpheum Circuit of Theatres
49
Documents September 1908July 1909
56
Telegram to Betty Blake 1908
75
Nov 1908
83
Pat Casey
89
Aug 1911 To Clement Vann Rogers
240
Oct 1911 Notice of Birth of Will Rogers Jr
249
World Series ticket 1911
253
Oct 1911 Clipping from Will Rogerss Scrapbook
257
March 1912 Clipping from Will Rogerss Scrapbook
263
Interior George M Cohans New Theatre New York City
271
Blanche Ring
277
April 1912 Advertisement from Will Rogerss Scrapbook
278

Dec 1908
90
Playbill Orpheum Theatre St Paul Minn 1909
95
Will and Betty Blake Rogers Atlantic City N J 1909
122
Introduction
123
July 1909 Betty Blake Rogers to Clement Vann Rogers
131
July 1909 Article from the Claremore Progress
138
May 1909
146
Sept 1909 To Clement Vann Rogers
152
Nov 1909 Betty Blake Rogers to Clement Vann Rogers
158
Feb 1910 Article from Will Rogerss Scrapbook
165
Oct 1910
189
Newspaper cartoon of Will Rogerss act 1911
210
Introduction
211
May 1911 Review from Variety
220
June 1911 Clipping from Will Rogerss Scrapbook
226
Fred Stone
229
Palace Theatre New York City
290
Introduction
291
March 1913 Review from the Milwaukee Journal
298
Jan 1914 Review and Listings from Three Theater
325
May 1914 From Frank Stine
335
Will Rogers and vaudeville friends Salt Lake City 1914
352
Oct 1914 Vaudeville Act Performance Notes
355
Edward F Albee and Will Rogers 1925
360
Introduction
361
BROADWAY FOOTLIGHTS
365
March 1915 Reviews from Keiths Theatre
371
NAME INDEX
401
BIBLIOGRAPHY
463
INDEX OF PERFORMERS AND ACTS
485
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2001)

Born in Oolagah, Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), Will Rogers's parents were Clem Vann Rogers and Mary American Schrimsher, who were each one-quarter Cherokee, or true Native Americans. This parentage is quite appropriate because Rogers himself was the embodiment of the real people of America, the "average man." He was the last of the "crackerbox philosophers" to reach a national audience, and his words and reputation as the symbol of the "common man" and of common sense have continued to grow, even though his books and films are seldom read or watched today. He has, as it were, transcended himself to become a folk legend. Rogers's rise from an Oklahoma cowboy to a world-famous humorist and philosopher is in itself a particularly American phenomenon. He began his career performing for Texas Jack's Wild West Show as a trick rider and roper. Later he performed for the Wirth Brothers Circus and then for the Mulhall Wild West Show. Eventually, he joined the Ziegfeld Follies as a regular, where he starred for 11 years. By the 1920s Rogers had become a popular speaker. He had already published two books, The Cowboy Philosopher on the Peace Conference (1919) and The Cowboy Philosopher on Prohibition (1919), both of which are collections of miscellaneous writings featuring the humorous social and political commentary that would eventually make him famous. In 1926 he began writing a syndicated column for the Saturday Evening Post, which became extremely popular and continued until his death. During the 1920s he also moved to California and began making films for Hal Roach Studios, in which he played characteristically unassuming roles and made sage and witty remarks. He made his first talking picture, They Had to See Paris, in 1929, which established him as a film star. Among Roger's other published collections of humor are The Illiterate Digest (1924), Letters of a Self-Made Diplomat to His President (1927), and There's Not a Bathing Suit in Russia (1927). An aviation enthusiast, Rogers died in a plane crash at Point Barrow, Alaska, in 1935 while flying with famous aviator Wiley Post. A selection of his writings, titled The Autobiography of Will Rogers (1949), was published posthumously.

Barbara Bair is Associate Editor of the Jane Addams Papers Project, History Department, Duke University. She is coeditor of "The Papers of Will Rogers: Volume One, November 1879-April 1904" & "The Papers of Will Rogers: Wild West & Vaudeville, April 1904-September 1908, Volume Two" (University of Oklahoma Press). She has taught & published widely in American cultural history.

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