The Parliamentary Or Constitutional History of England;: From the Earliest Times, to the Restoration of King Charles II. Collected from the Records, ...

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J. and R. Tonson, and A. Millar, in the Strand; and W. Sandby, in Fleet-Street., 1763
 

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Page 402 - Solemn League and Covenant for Reformation, and Defence of Religion, the Honour and Happinefs of the King ; and the Peace and Safety of the three Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland.
Page 430 - [As] for the thing we insist upon as Englishmen, — and surely our being Soldiers hath not stript us of that interest, although our malicious enemies would have it so, — we desire a Settlement of the Peace of the Kingdom and of the Liberties of the Subject...
Page 364 - So that it was privately refolv'd by the principal Perfons of the Houfe of Commons, that when he came the next Day into the Houfe, which he feldom omitted to do, they would fend him to the Tower ; prefuming, that if they had once...
Page 25 - Armies,6 by his own absolute will, against or without his Council of War, against many commands of the Committee of Both Kingdoms, and with contempt and vilifying of those commands ; — and, since the conjunction, sometimes against the Councils of War, and sometimes by persuading and deluding the Council to neglect one opportunity with pretence of another, and this again of a third, and at last by persuading ' them' that it was not fit to fight at all...
Page 422 - Engagement of the Army under the Command of his Excellency Sir Thomas Fairfax, read, assented unto, and Subscribed by all Officers, and Souldiers of the several Regiments, at the general Rendezvous near New-Market, on the 5th of June, 1647," in Rushworth's " Historical Collections,
Page 363 - And in these, and the like discourses, when he spake of the nation's being to be involved in new troubles, he would weep bitterly, and appear the most afflicted man in the world with the sense of the calamities which were like to ensue.
Page 243 - ... of the parliaments, and the liberties of the kingdoms, and to preferve and defend the king's...
Page 364 - Horfe, and from whence he writ a Letter to the Houfe of Commons, *• That having the Night before receiv'da Letter from fome Officers of his own Regiment, that the Jealoufy the Troops had conceiv'd of him, and of his Want of Kindnefs towards them, was much abated, fo that they...
Page 363 - ... in blood, he was rendered so odious unto them, that they had a purpose to kill him, if, upon some discovery made to him, he had not escaped out of their hands.
Page 122 - Lord the King of Spain, and the Lords the States General of the United Provinces of the Low Countries, as...

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