The Pelican Island, and other poems

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E. Littel, 1827 - 156 pages
 

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Page 112 - FRIEND after friend departs ; Who hath not lost a friend ? There is no union here of hearts, That finds not here an end : Were this frail world our only rest, Living or dying none were blest.
Page 117 - Thrice welcome, little English flower! My mother-country's white and red, In rose or lily, till this hour, Never to me such beauty spread: Transplanted from thine island-bed, A treasure in a grain of earth, Strange as a spirit from the dead, Thine embryo sprang to birth.
Page 130 - NIGHT is the time for rest ; How sweet when labours close, To gather round an aching breast The curtain of repose ; Stretch the tired limbs and lay the head Upon our own delightful bed ! Night is the time for dreams, The gay romance of life ; When truth that is, and truth that seems, Blend in fantastic strife ; Ah ! visions less beguiling far Than waking dreams by daylight are ! Night is the time for toil ; To plough the classic field, Intent to...
Page 132 - And hold communion there with God. Night is the time for death ; When all around is peace, Calmly to yield the weary breath, From sin and suffering cease : Think of heaven's bliss, and give the sign To parting friends — such death be mine...
Page 122 - Him midst shame and scorn ; My friendship's utmost zeal to try, He asked if I for Him would die ; The flesh was weak, my blood ran chill, But the free spirit cried,
Page 121 - I gave him all ; he bless'd it, brake, And ate ; but gave me part again : Mine was an angel's portion then ; For, while I fed with eager haste, That crust was manna to my taste. I spied him, where a fountain burst Clear from the rock ; his strength was gone ; The heedless water...
Page 8 - Light as a flake of foam upon the wind, Keel upward, from the deep emerged a shell, Shaped like the moon ere half her horn is filled ; Fraught with young life, it righted as it rose, And moved at will along the yielding water. The native pilot of this little bark Put out a tier of oars on either side, Spread to the wafting breeze a twofold sail, And mounted up and glided down the billow In happy freedom, pleased to feel the air And wander in the luxury of light.
Page 139 - HIGHER, higher will we climb Up the mount of glory, That our names may live through time In our country's story; Happy, when her welfare calls, He who conquers, he who falls. Deeper, deeper let us toil In the mines...
Page vii - The growth of coral appears to cease when the worm is no longer exposed to the washing of the sea. Thus, a reef rises in the form of a cauliflower, till its top has gained the level of the highest tides, above which the worm. has no power to advance, and the reef of course no longer extends itself upwards.
Page 113 - Thus star by star declines, Till all are passed away, As morning high and higher shines, To pure and perfect day ; Nor sink those stars in empty night, But hide themselves in heaven's own light.

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