The Persian Mystics

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J. Murray, 1907 - Islam - 105 pages
 

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Page 66 - Happy the moment when we are seated in the palace, thou and I, With two forms and with two figures but with one soul, thou and I. The colours of the grove and the voice of the birds will bestow immortality At the time when we come into the garden, thou and I. The stars of heaven will come to gaze upon us : We shall show them the moon herself, thou and I.
Page 107 - THE object of the Editors of this Series is a very definite one. They desire above all things that, in their humble way, these books shall be the ambassadors of good-will and understanding between East and West, the old world of Thought and the new of Action.
Page 31 - Do what thy manhood bids thee do, From none but self expect applause; He noblest lives and noblest dies Who makes and keeps his self-made laws.
Page 14 - Beautiful within itself, seeks to realize beauty without, by laborious production. His aim should rather be to concentrate and simplify, and so to expand his being ; instead of going out into the Manifold, to forsake it for the One, and so to float upwards towards the divine fount of being whose stream flows within him.
Page 69 - When the rose has faded and the garden is withered, The song of the nightingale is no longer to be heard. The BELOVED is all in all, the lover only veils Him; The BELOVED is all that lives, the lover a dead thing. When the lover feels no longer LOVE'S quickening, He becomes like a bird who has lost its wings. Alas! How can I retain my senses about me, When the BELOVED shows not the light of His countenance? LOVE desires that this secret should be revealed, For if a mirror reflects not, of what use...
Page 25 - She and I no more, but in One 'Undivided Being blended. 'All that is by Nature twain 'Fears, or suffers by, the pain 'Of Separation: Love is only 'Perfect when itself transcends 'Itself, and, one with that it loves, 'In undivided Being blends.
Page 63 - He comes, a moon whose like the sky ne'er saw, awake or dreaming, Crowned with eternal flame no flood can lay. Lo, from the flagon of thy love, O Lord, my soul is swimming, And ruined all my body's house of clay ! When first the Giver of the grape my lonely heart befriended, Wine fired my bosom and my veins filled up, But when his image all mine eye possessed, a voice descended : ' Well done, O sovereign Wine and peerless Cup ! ' Love's mighty arm from roof to base each dark abode is hewing Where...
Page 22 - Where'er thou seest a veil, Beneath that veil He hides. Whatever heart Doth yield to love, He charms it. In His love The heart hath life. Longing for Him, the soul Hath victory. That heart which seems to love The fair ones of this world, loves Him alone. Beware ! say not, ' He is All-Beautiful, And we His lovers '. Thou art but the glass, And He the face confronting it, which casts Its image on the mirror.
Page 103 - Glad at the friends' return, the Oxus deep Up to our girths in laughing waves shall leap. Long live Bukhara! Be thou of good cheer! Joyous towards thee hasteth our Amir! The Moon's the Prince, Bukhara is the sky; O Sky, the Moon shall light thee by and by!
Page 107 - Editors of this series is a very definite one. They desire above all things that, in their humble way, these books shall be the ambassadors of good-will and understanding between East and West — the old world of Thought and the new of Action. In this endeavour, and in their own sphere, they are but followers of the highest example in the land. They are confident that a deeper knowledge of the great ideals and lofty philosophy of Oriental thought may help to a revival of that true spirit of Charity...

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