The Pesticide Conspiracy

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University of California Press, Nov 17, 1989 - Science - 226 pages
Professor van den Bosch of the University of California was one of the developers of Integrated Pest Management—the use of biological controls, improved pest knowledge and observation, and judicious application of chemicals only when absolutely necessary. His research often suggested that less or no pesticides should be applied, which made him the target of both open and clandestine attack from industry and government figures. In protest, he wrote this passionate account of what Ecology called "the ultimate social disaster of: evolving pesticide-resistant insects, the destruction of their natural predators and parasites, emergent populations of new insect pests, downstream water pollution, atmospheric pollution, the 'accidental' killing of wildlife and people, and the bankruptcies of indigenous and small farmers."

As a new Introduction to this edition recounts, some lessening of dangerous overreliance on massive pesticide applications has been achieved since van den Bosch published this book in 1978—partly as a result of its influence. But the structural problems he described remain. The book has thus become a classic, along with Rachel Carson's Silent Spring.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
MOTHER NATURE AND THE GRAY COMPUTER
11
THE PESTICIDE TREADMILL
19
THE MELANCHOLY ADDICTION OF OL KING COTTON
39
THE MAKING OF AN ECORADICAL OR PARDON MY PARANOIA
49
THE POLITICS OF PEST CONTROL
59
STICKING IT TO CESAR THE SOCIOLOGY OF PEST CONTROL
75
THE TERRIBLE TUSSOCK TUSSLE
83
SCIENCE FOR SALE
121
FREEDOM OF THE PRESS WELL SORT OF
133
THE SORRIEST LOSER
141
INTEGRATED CONTROLA BETTER WAY TO BATTLE THE BUGS
149
TO TURN THE WORM
181
The Voices of Nature
209
GLOSSARY
211
NOTES AND REFERENCES
215

THE INSTANT PROFESSIONALS
95
OF APHIDS KNEES AND BLOODY MARYS
101
THE RAPE OF EPA
111
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Copyright

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Page 14 - Homo sapiens Our problem is that we are too smart for our own good, and for that matter, the good of the biosphere. The basic problem is that our brains enable us to evaluate, plan, and execute. Thus, while all other creatures are programmed by nature and subject to her whims, we have our gray computer to motivate, for good or evil, our chemical engine. Indeed, matters have progressed to the point where we attempt to operate independently of nature, challenging her dominance of the biosphere. This...

About the author (1989)

Robert van den Bosch was a Professor of Entomology at the University of California, Berkeley.

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