The Phonology of English : A Prosodic Optimality-Theoretic Approach: A Prosodic Optimality-Theoretic Approach

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Oxford University Press, UK, Apr 15, 1999 - 384 pages
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The Phonology of English introduces the subject from an Optimality-Theoretic perspective. Written by a high-profile American phonologist, the book presents an analysis of new generalizations about the surface shapes of English words. It will not only be the most up to date introduction to English phonology, but will also provide the clearest available account of Optimality Theory. Its combination of accessibility, originality and clear analysis make this essential reading for all those interested in the sounds of English words and some of the latest developments in linguistics theory. - ;The Phonology of English offers a new approach to English phonology. It focuses on the prosody of the language, i.e. syllable and foot structure, and does so from an optimality-theoretic (OT) perspective. The focus is on surface distributional regularities and the results presented are based on extensive searches through various computerized lexicons. The outcome is a number of new generalizations about the phonology of English, along with confirmation of some familiar regularities. All of these empirical results are discussed in detail and presented in extensive charts with a plethora of examples. The Phonology of English also offers a unique OT analysis. This provides a detailed introduction to the intricacies of the theory as applied to a significant amount of data. A number of important theoretical proposals are developed in this model, and the analysis presents the idea that certain complex constraints and their ranking can be derived in restricted ways from more basic constraints. In addition, the book also develops the idea that syllables of English can contain from zero to three moras. It is suggested that the phonology of English only makes sense if partial morphemes of the cranberry sort are licensed more widely. The book is thus intended as a detailed presentation of novel empirical results about the sound system of English, along with important theoretical results about phonological theory. -
 

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Contents

SOME BASIC IDEAS
1
12 Characterizing the sounds of English
4
13 Phonological generalizations
6
14 Treating phonological generalizations
12
15 Optimality Theory
13
16 Organization of the book
29
SYLLABLES
31
22 Distributional evidence for the syllable
33
56 Further reading
191
SYLLABLES AND STRESS
192
62 The analysis
204
63 Summary
246
THE RIGHTMOST STRESS
248
72 The basic analysis
260
73 The role of syllable weight
263
74 Other nominal stress patterns
267

23 A general theory of the syllable
40
24 Further reading
47
ENGLISH SYLLABLES MARGINS AND CONSONANTS
48
32 Wordfinal clusters
58
33 Medial clusters
68
34 Clusters vs margins and the sonority hierarchy
85
35 Linear restrictions
100
36 Summary
104
ENGLISH SYLLABLES PEAKS AND MORAS
105
42 Cooccurrence restrictions
107
43 Morabased restrictions
134
44 Syllable consonants and r
143
45 Summary
147
46 Further reading
148
STRESS ACCENT AND FEET
149
52 What is a metrical foot?
151
54 Distributional evidence for the foot
155
55 General theory of the foot
167
75 Final syllables
270
76 Verbs and adjectives
276
77 Summary
282
78 Further reading
283
OTHER STRESSES
284
82 Long vowels
318
84 Morphemes and feet
322
85 Summary
329
86 Further reading
330
AFTERWORD
331
93 Statistics and frequency
332
94 Russian
334
95 Remaining empirical issues
336
97 Further reading
338
References
341
Subject
345
Word
349
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