The Physics of Baseball: Third Edition, Revised, Updated, and Expanded

Front Cover
Harper Collins, May 7, 2002 - Science - 192 pages

Blending scientific fact and sports trivia, Robert Adair examines what a baseball or player in motion does-and why. How fast can a batted ball go? What effect do stitch patterns have on wind resistance? How far does a curve ball break? Who reaches first base faster after a bunt, a right- or left-handed batter? The answers are often surprising -- and always illuminating.

This newly revised third edition considers recent developments in the science of sport such as the neurophysiology of batting, bat vibration, and the character of the "sweet spot." Faster pitchers, longer hitters, and enclosed stadiums also get a good, hard scientific look to determine their effects on the game.

Filled with anecdotes about famous players and incidents, The Physics of Baseball provides fans with fascinating insights into America's favorite pastime.

 

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User Review  - iayork - LibraryThing

You need to know a significant amount of math and physics to understand it: This book is one that the serious fan will enjoy, but only if you understand a good deal of physics. Some of the problems ... Read full review

User Review  - Overstock.com

A fun book delivering just what it says a physics description of what makes baseball work like it does. Recommended for those with a science bent and a passion for baseball. Read full review

Contents

MODELS AND THEIR LIMITATIONS
1
THE SWING OF THE BAT
29
PITCHING
47
BATTING THE BALL
79
PROPERTIES OF BATS
112
RUNNING FIELDING AND THROWING
145
INDEX
163
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Robert Adair is Sterling Professor Emeritus of Physics at Yale University and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. His research has largely been concerned with the properties of the elementary particles and forces of the universe.

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