The Plea of the Midsummer Fairies: Hero and Leander, Lycus the Centaur, and Other Poems

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1827 - 222 pages
 

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Page 200 - III, I remember, I remember Where I was used to swing, And thought the air must rush as fresh To swallows on the wing; My spirit flew in feathers then, That is so heavy now, And summer pools could hardly cool The fever on my brow ! IV. I remember, I
Page 170 - s gone into the West, To dazzle when the sun is down, And rob the world of rest: She took our daylight with her, The smiles that we love best, With morning blushes on her cheek, And pearls upon her breast. II. 0 turn again, fair
Page 170 - 0 turn again, fair lues, Before the fall of night, For fear the Moon should shine alone, And stars unrivall'd bright; And blessed will the lover be That walks beneath their light, And breathes the love against thy cheek 1 dare not even write
Page 171 - IV. I saw thee, lovely Ines, Descend along the shore, With bands of noble gentlemen, And banners wav'd before ; And gentle youth and maidens gay, And snowy plumes they wore ; — It would have been a beauteous dream, — If it had been no more ! Alas, alas, fair Ines,
Page 171 - thee so near! Were there no bonny dames at home, Or no true lovers here, That he should cross the seas to win The dearest of the dear ? IV. I saw thee, lovely Ines, Descend along the shore, With bands of noble gentlemen, And banners wav'd before ; And gentle youth and maidens gay, And snowy plumes they wore
Page 169 - The meeting sweet that made me thrill, The sweetmeats almost sweeter still, No ' satis' to the 'jams !' — When that I was a tiny boy My days and nights were full of joy, My mates were blithe and kind! No wonder that I sometimes sigh, And dash the tear-drop from my eye, To cast a look behind ! FAIR INES.
Page 155 - my bag was stor'd,Now I must play with Elgin's lord, With Theseus for a taw! My playful horse has slipt his string, Forgotten all his capering, And harness'd to the law ! My kite — how fast and far it flew ! Whilst I, a sort of Franklin, drew My pleasure from the sky ! 'Twas
Page 218 - The year's in the wane, There is nothing adorning, The night has no eve, And the day has no morning; Cold winter gives warning. The rivers run chill, The red sun is sinking, And I am grown old, And life is fast shrinking; — Here 's enow for sad thinking
Page 209 - Wherever he may be, the stars Must daily lose their light; The moon will veil her in the shade; The sun will set at night. The sun may set, but constant love Will shine when he's away; So that dull night is never night, And day is brighter day.
Page 209 - I. THE stars are with the voyager Wherever he may sail; The moon is constant to her time ; The sun will never fail; But follow, follow round the world, The green earth and the sea; So love is with the lover's heart, Wherever he may be. H, Wherever he may be, the stars Must daily lose their light;

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