The Political Problem of Religious Pluralism: And Why Philosophers Can't Solve It

Front Cover
Lexington Books, 2010 - Philosophy - 263 pages
In contemporary political philosophy, there is much debate over how to maintain a public order in pluralistic democracies in which citizens hold radically different religious views. The Political Problem of Religious Pluralism deals with this theoretically and practically difficult issue by examining three of the most influential figures of religious pluralism theory: John Rawls, Jacques Maritain, and Alasdair MacIntyre. Drawing on a diverse number of sources, Kozinski addresses the flaws in each philosopher's views and shows that the only philosophically defensible end of any overlapping consensus political order must be the eradication of the ideological pluralism that makes it necessary. In other words, a pluralistic society should have as its primary political aim to create the political conditions for the communal discovery and political establishment of that unifying tradition within which political justice can most effectively be obtained. Kozinski's analysis, though exhaustive and rigorous, still remains accessible and engaging, even for a reader unversed in the works of Rawls, Maritain, and MacIntyre. Interdisciplinary and multi-thematic in nature, it will appeal to anyone interested in the intersection of religion, politics, and culture.
 

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Contents

Jacques Maritains Democratic Charter
47
Alasdair MacIntyres Confessional Consensus
127
Bibliography
247
Index
255
About the Author
263
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About the author (2010)

Thaddeus L. Kozinski is assistant professor of humanities and philosophy at Wyoming Catholic College.

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