The Political Sociology of Human Rights

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 30, 2015 - Social Science - 232 pages
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The language of human rights is the most prominent 'people-centred' language of global justice today. This textbook looks at how human rights are constructed at local, national, international and transnational levels and considers commonalities and differences around the world. Through discussions of key debates in the interdisciplinary study of human rights, the book develops its themes by considering examples of human rights advocacy in international organisations, national states and local grassroots movements. Case studies relating to specific organisations and institutions illustrate how human rights are being used to address structural injustices: imperialist geopolitics, authoritarianism and corruption, inequalities created by 'freeing' markets, dangers faced by transnational migrants as a result of the securitization of borders, and violence against women.
 

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Contents

The social construction of human rights
1
A human rights movements and other organisations
19
States of human rights
41
not a world state
67
Humanising capitalism
89
Womens rights are human rights
115
Do migrants have rights?
135
What works? Paradoxes in the human rights field
156
Notes
173
Further reading
189
Index
215
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About the author (2015)

Kate Nash is a Professor in the Department of Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London.

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