The Prehistory of Home

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University of California Press, Apr 18, 2012 - Social Science - 269 pages
Many animals build shelters, but only humans build homes. No other species creates such a variety of dwellings. Drawing examples from across the archaeological record and around the world, archaeologist Jerry D. Moore recounts the cultural development of the uniquely human imperative to maintain domestic dwellings. He shows how our houses allow us to physically adapt to the environment and conceptually order the cosmos, and explains how we fabricate dwellings and, in the process, construct our lives. The Prehistory of Home points out how houses function as symbols of equality or proclaim the social divides between people, and how they shield us not only from the elements, but increasingly from inchoate fear.
 

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Contents

The Prehistory of Home
1
Starter Homes
15
Mobile Homes
32
Durable Goods
48
Model Homes
70
Apartment Living
93
Gated Communities
116
Noble Houses
141
Sacred Homes
162
Home Fires
180
Going Home
202
Conclusion
220
Notes
227
Illustration Credits
261
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Jerry D. Moore is Professor of Anthropology at California State University, Dominguez Hills. He is the author of Architecture and Power in the Ancient Andes, Cultural Landscapes in the Prehispanic Andes, and Visions of Culture: An Introduction to Anthropological Theories and Theorists.

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