The Prisoner's Wife

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, May 11, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 240 pages
As a favor for a friend, a bright and talented young woman volunteered to read her poetry to a group of prisoners during a Black History Month program. It was an encounter that would alter her life forever, because it was there, in the prison, that she would meet Rashid, the man who was to become her friend, her confidant, her husband, her lover, her soul mate. At the time, Rashid was serving a sentence of twenty years to life for his part in a murder. The Prisoner's Wife is a testimony, for wives and mothers, friends and families. It's a tribute to anyone who has ever chosen, against the odds, to love.
 

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User Review  - KatieHeflin - LibraryThing

This is an awesome read. It takes us into the story of this woman who happened to go to a prison one day to read her poetry to the men and happens to meet one of prisoners there and they start to fall ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - spoko - LibraryThing

I don't even know where to begin describing this book. It's absolutely stunning. One of my all-time favorite books, and one of very few that I would give a perfect ‘10' to. All I knew going in was the ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
13
Section 2
34
Section 3
37
Section 4
45
Section 5
55
Section 6
58
Section 7
60
Section 8
65
Section 16
153
Section 17
155
Section 18
159
Section 19
163
Section 20
166
Section 21
169
Section 22
176
Section 23
187

Section 9
99
Section 10
113
Section 11
129
Section 12
133
Section 13
139
Section 14
141
Section 15
149
Section 24
190
Section 25
195
Section 26
200
Section 27
206
Section 28
222
Copyright

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Page 5 - I have been locked by the lawless. Handcuffed by the haters. Gagged by the greedy. And, if i know any thing at all, it's that a wall is just a wall and nothing more at all. It can be broken down.
Page 11 - Wife this is a love story 9/his is a love story like every love story I had always known, like no love story I could ever have imagined. It's everything beautiful — bright colors, candle-scented rooms, orange silk, and lavender amethyst. It's everything grotesque, disfigured. It's long twisting wounds, open and unhealed, nerves pricked raw, exposed. This is a love story, awake and alive. It's a breathing document, a living witness. It's human possibility, hope, and connection. It's a gathering...
Page 21 - And some people really are, straight-up, victims. At first we say we're all political prisoners because of the politics of the criminal justice system. And race is always an issue. But you know, as you get older, you want to take responsibility for all your life. Because if you live long enough, you do good things too. And I began to want to claim the good I had done.
Page 22 - I wanted desperately to please my parents, to make them proud. My parents, I knew, had made incredible sacrifices for my sister and me, to have a nice home, to go to good schools, to be exposed to the arts. We were middle-class but never rich by any stretch of the imagination. Whatever we had, my sister and I, came as a result of the long, often arduous hours my parents put in at their respective jobs.

About the author (2010)

Asha Bandele served as features editor and writer for Essence magazine, and is currently a Revson Fellow at Columbia University. She is the author of the memoir The Prisoner's Wife and a collection of poetry. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her daughter.

Bibliographic information