The Psychology of Selling and Advertising

Front Cover
McGraw-Hill book Company, Incorporated, 1925 - Advertising - 468 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 212 - The character abruptly rises to another 'level', and deliberation comes to an immediate end. In the fifth and final type of decision, the feeling that the evidence is all in, and that reason has balanced the books, may be either present or absent. But in either case we feel, in deciding, as if we ourselves by our own wilful act inclined the beam: in the former case by adding our living effort to the weight of the logical reason which, taken alone, seems powerless to make the act discharge; in the...
Page 212 - There is a fourth form of decision, which often ends deliberation as suddenly as the third form does. It comes when, in consequence of some outer experience or some inexplicable inward change, we suddenly pass from the easy and careless to the sober and strenuous mood, or possibly the other way. The whole scale of values of our motives and impulses then undergoes a change like that which a change of the observer's level produces on a view. The most sobering possible agents are objects of grief and...
Page 241 - I am arguing that the pattern of stereotypes at the center of our codes largely determines what group of facts we shall see, and in what light we shall see them. That is why, with the best will in the world, the news policy of a journal tends to support its editorial policy; why a capitalist sees one set of facts, and certain aspects of human nature, literally sees them; his socialist opponent another set and other aspects, and why each regards the other as unreasonable or perverse, when the real...
Page 241 - ... tentative conclusions. He infers "that, in the present state of education, a public opinion is primarily a moralized and codified version of the facts" and that "the pattern of stereotypes at the center of our codes largely determines what group of facts we shall see, and in what light we shall see them.
Page 185 - Houston," he said as he stopped playing and turned round on the bench, "how you enjoy a piano depends more on the one playing it than on the piano itself. By the way, what instructor are you going to have for your daughter?'' "Miss Martin," the lady replied. "Hum!" returned the salesman, "I would advise you to have Professor Habicht." "Mercy!" she exclaimed. "He charges $5 for half-hour lessons! I cannot afford it.
Page 65 - I want a pair of Fownes," to any American glove merchant, he is not likely to answer: "Excuse me, what was it you wanted?" He knows that you want gloves — good gloves — and he will show you Fownes if he has them, or explain the merits of another brand. And the slogan at the bottom of the advertisement is: "It's a Fownes — that's all you need to know about a glove.
Page 212 - If examined closely, its chief difference from the former cases appears to be that in these cases the mind at the moment of deciding on the triumphant alternative dropped the other one wholly or nearly out of sight, whereas here both alternatives are steadily held in view, and in the very act of murdering the vanquished possibility the chooser realizes how much in that instant he is making himself lose.
Page 210 - and Amundsen, and Sverdrup. They had only their story to tell. Why don't you believe me?
Page 212 - The consequence is an instant abandonment of the more trivial projects with which we had been dallying, and an instant practical acceptance of the more grim and earnest alternative which till then could not extort our mind 's consent. All those 'changes of heart ', 'awakenings of conscience ', etc., which make new men of so many of us may be classed under this head. The character abruptly rises to another 'level', and deliberation comes to an immediate end.
Page 345 - Usually in our helplessness, we bring the trade-marks, labels or packages into the court, show them to the judge, and according as we are on one side of the case or the other, point out their likenesses or analyze their differences. Then the judge, in the exercise of his judicial common-sense, settles the rights of the parties as they look to him.

Bibliographic information