The Psychosocial Interior of the Family

Front Cover
Gerald Handel, Gail G. Whitchurch
Transaction Publishers, 1967 - Psychology - 674 pages

Drawing upon findings from many disciplines including sociology, communication, family studies, human development, psychology and anthropology-this book provides the first composite study of the whole family and of the complex interplay between self and collectivity in family life. It departs sharply from the traditional two-person, cause-effect models used in conventional studies, and attempts to delineate a social psychology of the family.

This book undertakes to define and understand the nature of families, to point out ways of discerning different family characters, and to comprehend the processes by which these characters are established and maintained; by so doing, it introduces a new dimension into the study of family behavior and provides a framework within which meaningful investigations and practical applications can be pursued.

This long-awaited fourth edition continues the goal of preceding editions: to understand families in terms of the kinds of interaction through which family life is constructed. Contributors drawn from a wide variety of disciplines sociology; communication; family studies; human development; psychology; anthropology; and social work - provide a range of authoritative and up-to-date sources on the family and interpersonal relations, including newly emergent forms of family organization. In providing a new framework for fruitful investigation and practical application, this volume contains the best available interdisciplinary work on the social psychology of the family.

Gerald Handel received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, where he served on the Committee on Human Development. He has written many books such as Making a Life in Yorkville, Childhood Socialization, and The Psychosocial Interior of the Family all available from Transaction. He has also written many articles on the family. He is currently professor emeritus at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Gail G. Whitchurch is associate professor of Communication Studies, adjunct associate professor of Sociology, and adjunct associate professor of International Studies at Indiana University- Bloomington. She is the author of many articles in research and practice journals. She was also co-founder and past chair of the Family Communication Division of the National Communication Association.

 

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Contents

The Family as a Psychosocial Organization
xxix
Marriage and the Construction of Reality An Exercise in the Microsociology of Knowledge
15
Marriage and the Construction of Reality Then and Now
33
Using Qualitative Methods to Study Families
49
Qualitative Study of Whole Families in a Time of Great Change
65
Family Research A Case for Interviewing Couples
83
Ethical Dilemmas in Qualitative Family Research
105
The Three Phases of Systemic Maturation
125
Women Work and Family Changing Gender Roles and Psychological WellBeing
321
Power in the Family
337
Reconstructing the Family
359
Making Family under a Shiftwork Schedule Air Force Security Guards and Their Wives
371
Marital Conflict over Intimacy
397
Stages in the Infants Separation from the Mother
415
Dual Parenting and the Duel of Intimacy
445
Centripetal and Centrifugal Forces in the Adolescent Separation Drama
461

Family Boundary Ambiguity Perceptions of Adult Stepfamily Members
135
Challenging Boundaries An Adolescent in a Homosexual Family
155
An Anthropological Approach to Family Studies
173
Family Ecologies of Ethnic Minority Children
183
Determinants of Family Culture Effects on Fatherhood
207
The Appropriation of the Parental Role through Communication during the Transition to Parenthood
225
The Dialectic of Marital and Parental Relationships within Stepfamily
251
Television and Family Interaction
277
Constructing the Family
295
The Work of Love
309
Central Issues in the Construction of Sibling Relationships
489
Building Gay Families
521
Coping with Family Transitions Winners Losers and Survivors
533
The Downwardly Mobile Family
557
Sex Codes and Family Life Among Northtons Youth
581
A Different Kind of Parenting
605
Backward toward the Postmodern Family Reflections on Gender Kinship and Class in the Silicon
639
Index
665
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