The Radio Station: Broadcast, Satellite & Internet

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Taylor & Francis, 2009 - Performing Arts - 343 pages
7 Reviews

The Radio Station is considered the standard work on radio media. It remains a concise and candid guide to the internal workings of radio stations and the radio industry in all of its various forms. Not only will you begin understand how each job at a radio station is best performed, you will learn how it meshes with those of the rest of the radio station staff. If you are uncertain of your career goals, this book provides a solid foundation in who does what, when, and why.

The Radio Station details all departments within a radio station--be it a terrestrial, satellite, or Internet operation—from the inside-out, covering technology to operations, and sales to syndication. It also offers an overview of how government regulations affect radio stations today and how radio stations have adapted to new communications technologies. Drawing on the insights and observations of those who make their daily living by working in the industry, this edition continues its tradition of presenting the real-world perspective of where radio comes from, and where it is heading. The Eighth Edition of this classic text includes expanded sections on digital, satellite, and Internet radio; integration of new technologies; new and evolving formats; the uses and applications of podcasts and blogs; mobile multimedia devices; programming for the new radio formats; new contributions by key industry executives; digital studios; station clustering and consolidation; industry economics and statistics; and updated rules and regulations. The new companion website features the interviews and essays with industry professionals, an image bank, additional suggested reading, and a listing of helpful links to industry websites. This edition is loaded with new illustrations, feature boxes and quotes from industry pros, bringing it all together for the reader.

* Classic and candid guide to the internal workings of radio stations * Updated coverage of the podcasting boom, the clustering of radio stations and station management, the integration of new (digital) technology, and more * New analysis of satellite radio and its role in radio broadcasting today * Brand new companion website

* The Radio Station is now celebrating its 25th anniversary!

 

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Contents

1 State of the Fifth Estate
1
2 Station Management
45
3 Programming
75
4 Sales
125
5 News
159
6 Research
182
7 Promotion
215
8 Traffic and Billing
237
9 Production
251
10 Engineering
275
11 Consultants and Syndicators
303
Afterword
328
Glossary
331
Index
337
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Michael C. Keith, Ph.D., ranks among the most prolific authors on the subject of broadcast media, in particular radio. He is a member of the Communication Department at Boston College and is author of over twenty books, including Voices in the Purple Haze, Signals in the Air, Talking Radio, Radio Cultures, and Sounds in the Dark. With Robert Hilliard he has co-authored The Broadcast Century and Beyond, Waves of Rancor, Dirty Discourse, Global Broadcasting Systems, and The Hidden Screen. With Christopher Sterling he co-authored Sounds of Change: FM Broadcasting in America. In addition, he is the author of numerous journal articles and has served in a number of editorial positions. He is the past Chair of Education for the Museum of Broadcast Communications, the inaugural chair of the Broadcast Education Association's Radio Division, and a former broadcaster. He is the recipient of several honors, including the Distinguished Scholar Award given by the Broadcast Education Association in 2008, and the Stanton Fellow Award given by the International Radio Television Society. He is the author of a critically acclaimed memoir, The Next Better Place: A Father and Son on the Road (Algonquin Press), in 2003. Visit the author's website: www.michaelckeith.com.

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