The R&D Workers: Managing Innovation in Britain, Germany, Japan, and the United States

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1995 - Business & Economics - 163 pages
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Selecting, training, and managing the scientists, engineers, and technologists who develop new products and apply new technologies is a critical challenge for managers and policymakers worldwide. Nine analysts from universities and research centers in four major industrialized nations find that while companies maintain distinctive approaches to managing their R&D workers, the pressures of technological change and global competition are forcing them to rethink the entire operation. To be taken into consideration now are such factors as group dynamics, intra- and intercompany linkages, research authority and flexibility, research sources, career paths, reward systems, and personal and team development-all of which are covered here. An unusual comparative study for top management and their human resource and planning staffs, and for academics concerned with all aspects of organizational behavior, training, and development.

The scientists, engineers, and technologists who develop new products and apply new technologies-collectively, the R&D workers-are vital in today's competitive and technologically demanding business environment. Of critical importance is how these R&D workers are selected, trained, and managed, and how their activities are linked to other aspects of production. Using a variety of methods, eight analysts from the International Research Group on R&D Management, a unique interdisciplinary group of researchers from universities and research centers in four major industrialized nations, examine the organization and management of R&D workers in and between their respective countries.

Drawing on data provided by more than 1,800 engineers and scientists in 23 companies, the authors find that while companies maintain distinctive approaches to managing their R&D workers, the pressures of technological change and global competition are forcing them to rethink their R&D methods. To be taken into consideration now are such factors as the underlying technical skills of the workers, group dynamics, intra- and intercompany linkages, research authority and flexibility, research resources, career paths, reward systems, and personal and team development-all of which are covered here, succinctly and readably. The result is a useful comparative study for top management and their human resource and planning staffs, R&D policymakers, and those concerned with all aspects of organizational behavior, training, and development.

 

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Contents

Crisis Management in a Nutshell
5
The Activity of Doing Research
21
Assessing Your Vulnerability
37
Goal Setting as Part of Crisis Planning
55
Organizing to Manage Crisis
73
Putting Controls in Place
95
Understanding Your Stakeholders
113
Triggering Events
133
Human Communications
143
Communicating in a Crisis
161
Crisis Communication Tactics
179
Evaluate Recover Revise
191
Epilogue
199
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Page 1 - The Chinese use two brush strokes to write the word 'crisis.' One brush stroke stands for danger; the other for opportunity. In a crisis, be aware of the danger — but recognize the opportunity.
Page 10 - A number of difficulties have been noted as being common to the management of crises: uncertainty, poor data-handling methods, too little data, too much data, inadequate communications, differing value systems, changing management objectives, political harassment, little planning, and insufficient time in which to learn. To this long list of conceptual difficulties must be added the psychological and physical problems of confusion and fatigue. Clearly, the successful crisis manager must be a versatile...
Page 6 - Virtually every crisis contains within itself the seeds of success as well as the roots of failure.

About the author (1995)

INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH GROUP ON R&D MANAGEMENT is an interdisciplinary group of analysts from universities and research centers in Britain, Germany, Japan, and the United States. With expertise in human resource management, economics, sociology, engineering, business administration, and policy analysis, the Group was formed in the late 1980s to study the organization, processes, and management of research and development in and between their respective countries. The Group's members have published extensively on employment, economic development, and industrial, and technology management topics. The volume editor, Philip Shapira, is Associate Professor at the School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology.

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