The Ray Bradbury chronicles, Volume 3

Front Cover
Bantam Books, Oct 1, 1992 - Fiction - 80 pages
Illustrated by some of the premier talents in the comics art industry, The Ray Bradbury Chronicles are graphic adaptations of some of Bradbury's most fondly remembered tales of science fiction, fantasy, and horror, rendered in styles ranging from line art to full oil paintings. For readers of comics, science fiction, and viewers of "The Ray Bradbury Theatre" on weekly cable TV.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Jessiqa - LibraryThing

This book contains two comic books based on Bradbury's short stories. All but one of the stories included in this volume were ones that I had previously read, so it was nice to experience them in this ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mschaefer - LibraryThing

Five (authorized) adaptations of Bradbury stories as graphic short stories, outstanding: "Dark they were and Golden-Eyed" by Kent Williams and John van Fleet, "The Dragon" by Segrelles and "I, Robot ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Ray Bradbury, author of more than 500 stories, poems, essays, plays, films, television plays, radio, music, and comic books, was born on August 22, 1920, in Waukegan, Illinois. Twice during his childhood, Bradbury moved with his family to Arizona, returning to the midwest both times before settling permanently in Los Angeles in 1934. At the age of fifteen, Bradbury began submitting short stories to national magazines, beginning his career as one of the best known science-fiction writers of all time. After his graduation from Los Angeles High School in 1938, Bradbury worked his way up from selling newspapers on street corners and publishing short stories in amateur fan magazines to writing the best-selling classics The Martian Chronicles, published in 1950, and Fahrenheit 451, published in 1953. Bradbury has won numerous awards for his works. His Sun and Shadow won the Benjamin Franklin Award of 1953-54 for Best Story in an American Magazine. In 1954, Fahrenheit 451 won the Commonwealth Club of California Gold Medal and Bradbury received an award from the National Institute of Arts and Letters for contribution to American literature. Switch on the Night earned the Boys Club of America Junior Book Award in 1956. Icarus Montgolfier Wright in 1963 garnered an Academy Award nomination for short film. He was honored in 1977 with a World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement, and in 1977 with the Balrog Award for Best Poet. In addition to his writing achievements, Bradbury was the idea consultant and wrote the basic scenario for the United States pavilion at the 1964 World's Fair, as well as being an imagineer for Walt Disney Enterprises, where he designed the Spaceship Earth exhibition at Walt Disney World's Epcot Center. Bradbury lives in Los Angeles.

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