The Recluse

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Macmillan, 1888 - 56 pages
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Page 10 - tis the sense Of majesty, and beauty, and repose, A blended holiness of earth and sky, Something that makes this individual spot, This small abiding-place of many men, A termination, and a last retreat, A centre, come from wheresoe'er you will, A whole without dependence or defect, Made for itself, and happy in itself, Perfect contentment, Unity entire.
Page 53 - Which craft of delicate Spirits hath composed From earth's materials — waits upon my steps ; Pitches her tents before me as I move, An hourly neighbour. Paradise, and groves Elysian, Fortunate Fields — like those of old Sought in the Atlantic Main — why should they be A history only of departed things, Or a mere fiction of what never was ? For the, discerning intellect of Man, When wedded to this goodly universe In love and holy passion, shall find these A simple produce of the common day.
Page 53 - Atlantic Main, why should they be A history only of departed things, Or a mere fiction of what never was? For the discerning intellect of Man, When wedded to this goodly universe In love and holy passion, shall find these A simple produce of the common day. — I, long before the blissful hour arrives, Would chant, in lonely peace, the spousal verse Of this great consummation ; — and, by words Which speak of nothing more than what we are, Would I arouse the sensual from their sleep Of Death, and...
Page 52 - All strength — all terror, single or in bands, That ever was put forth in personal form — Jehovah — with his thunder, and the choir Of shouting Angels, and the empyreal thrones — I pass them unalarmed. Not Chaos, not The darkest pit of lowest Erebus, Nor aught of blinder vacancy, scooped out By help of dreams — can breed such fear and awe As fall upon us often when we look Into our Minds, into the Mind of Man — My haunt, and the main region of my song.
Page 54 - To noble raptures; while my voice proclaims How exquisitely the individual Mind (And the progressive powers perhaps no less Of the whole species) to the external World Is fitted: — and how exquisitely, too — Theme this but little heard of among men — The external World is fitted to the Mind; And the creation (by no lower name Can it be called) which they with blended might Accomplish: — this is our highest argument.
Page 51 - fit audience let me find, though few ! " So prayed, more gaining than he asked, the Bard In holiest mood. Urania, I shall need Thy guidance, or a greater Muse, if such Descend to earth or dwell in highest heaven ! For I must tread on shadowy ground, must sink Deep, and, aloft ascending, breathe in worlds To which the heaven of heavens is but a veil. All strength, all terror, single or in bands, That ever was put forth in personal form — Jehovah, with his thunder, and the choir Of shouting Angels,...
Page 47 - Yea, to this hour I cannot read a Tale Of two brave vessels matched in deadly fight, And fighting to the death, but I am pleased More than a wise man ought to be ; I wish, Fret, burn, and struggle, and in soul am there.
Page 50 - Man, on Nature, and on Human Life Musing in Solitude, I oft perceive Fair trains of imagery before me rise, Accompanied by feelings of delight Pure, or with no unpleasing sadness mixed ; And I am conscious of affecting thoughts And dear remembrances, whose presence soothes Or elevates the Mind, intent to weigh The good and evil of our mortal state. — To these emotions, whencesoe'er they come, Whether from breath of outward circumstance, Or from the Soul — an impulse to herself, I would give utterance...
Page 48 - Some nursling of the mountains which she leads Through quiet meadows, after he has learnt His strength, and had his triumph and his joy, His desperate course of tumult and of glee.
Page 8 - To aid him, and in Song resound his joy. The boon is absolute; surpassing grace To me hath been vouchsafed ; among the bowers Of blissful Eden this was neither given, Nor could be given, possession of the good...

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